In The News

Jailbirds Don't Tweet

Wildhorse Saloon, 120 2nd Avenue North, Nashville


Stephen Zralek, and the Harmon Group, will present "Jailbirds Don’t Tweet:

How to Build a Social Media Campaign That Won’t Land You In Legal Hot Water”.


Click here to RSVP. When creating your login, please note that you are a guest of Bone McAllester Norton.


Complimentary light breakfast will be served.

Parking is available at the Commerce Garage on

3rd and Commerce.

Bonelaw Client Stays with Trends

Growlers, half gallon jugs used to transport beer, are one of the hottest growth areas in the beer business, most recently expanding to upscale beer stores in the Nashville area.



Nashville's newest brewery, and Will Cheek client, Jackalope, joins a growing trend of breweries selling only kegs and growlers of beer.  This allows the brewery to open without purchasing expensive bottling equipment.  Some say it also enhances the mystique of the craft brewer.

The Next Tidal Wave in Social Media: Video, Apps, QR Codes and Location-based Software

Video, apps, QR Codes and LBS (for location based software, not pounds) are about to be the next tidal wave in social media. It's not that Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are losing any prominence (yet), but more and more businesses are waking up to see new ways to connect with their audiences. When law firms and banks (conservative by nature) start adding video to their home pages, you know something's catching on.

As these forms of social media become more popular, they raise new issues for the law to grapple with. Who owns the content? Did you get permission to include an image of that person or that song in your video? Have you informed your users that you plan to sell information about their visiting patterns whenever they view your site? Thoughts for businesses, legislatures and the courts to consider...

The Next Tidal Wave in Social Media: Video, Apps, QR Codes and Location-based Software

Video, apps, QR Codes and LBS (for location based software, not pounds) are about to be the next tidal wave in social media. It's not that Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are losing any prominence (yet), but more and more businesses are waking up to see new ways to connect with their audiences. When law firms and banks (conservative by nature) start adding video to their home pages, you know something's catching on.

As these forms of social media become more popular, they raise new issues for the law to grapple with. Who owns the content? Did you get permission to include an image of that person or that song in your video? Have you informed your users that you plan to sell information about their visiting patterns whenever they view your site? Thoughts for businesses, legislatures and the courts to consider...

Bone McAllester Norton Welcomes Stephanie Taylor!

Bone McAllester finds musician to lead entertainment group


Classically trained violinist joins law firm
Published June 10, 2011 by NashvillePost.c...

Bone McAllester Norton has hired an attorney and accomplished musician to lead its entertainment law group.

Stephanie R. Taylor, a classically trained violinist and country/bluegrass fiddle player, joins Bone McAllester after running her own local firm. Taylor represents artists and music industry professionals and negotiates entertainment industry contracts for artists, as well as licensing and distribution deals for original television programs. She has been a professor of music business at Middle Tennessee State University and directed MTSU’s Recording Industry Exchange program with Russia.

“We are pleased to announce Stephanie in her new role. She brings experience and a vast knowledge of the entertainment industry and has an excellent track record in her representation of clients in the business," said Charles W. Bone, firm chairman.

Taylor earned her law degree and bachelor's in music education from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She received master's degree in business administration with an emphasis on music business from Belmont University.

Taylor's musical career has included eight years as a contract violinist with the Lincoln Symphony Orchestra in Lincoln Nebraska, and she has played with numerous big-name musicians, including with Grammy nominated Chris Young, award winning singers/songwriters Billy Yates and Billy Falcon, bluegrass talent Dana Romanello and country duo Joey and Rory. She was recently inducted into the South Dakota Old Time Fiddlers Hall of Fame.

Click here for the whole article (subscription needed)

 

Bone McAllester Norton welcomes attorney James E. Mackler to our team!

James is a graduate of Duke University, where he graduated cum laude with a degree in public policy studies.  He received his law degree, with honors,  from the University of Washington School of Law where he served as the president of the Moot Court Honor Board.
After spending seven years developing a successful private practice in Colorado, James was inspired by the events of September 11, 2001 to join the Army.  He spent three years as a Blackhawk helicopter pilot with the 101st Airborne Division, including a one year deployment to Iraq.  After returning from Iraq, James transferred to the Judge Advocate General Corps where he served as a legal advisor to high level commanders and as a senior trial counsel.



James lives in Nashville with his wife Shana, and their two daughters, Hanna and Sylvie. He continues to serve in the Army Reserves.   He is actively involved in the Nashville community, including service on the board of Jewish Family Services.


Along with his litigation practice, James will provide legal assistance to members of the military transitioning into the civilian sector, including entrepreneur start-ups, fundamental business issues, and the day to day legal issues that veterans encounter with a new business.

Will Cheek Named Renaissance Man by NFocus Magazine

Will Cheek


That tow-headed guy in the convertible that just passed you was William T. Cheek, III or “Will.” An active volunteer for several local charities, Will has served as chairman of the Board of the Center for Nonprofit Management, the Metro Nashville Arts Commission, The Belcourt Theatre and Community Resource Center. He serves on the board of Children’s House of Nashville, Inc., the Belcourt Theatre, and as legal counsel to Artrageous, Inc., and Nashville Pride.

 

 

To Drink or Not To Drink

2011 has seen several cities voting on whether to expand liquor sales, either on premises or off premises.  Below are a few of the 2011 developments.

  • In May, voters in the city of Lawrenceburg overwhelmingly approved the sale of liquor, 806 to 597.

  • Also in May, Pigeon Forge voters defeated liquor in restaurants for the second time in 2 years, 590 to 482.  Establishments in the city were already allowed to sell beer and wine, but not liquor.  We see this as unusual since Pigeon Forges’ largest business is tourism, and many tourists expect full liquor service at restaurants.  We hear that the town’s biggest attraction, Dollywood, worked against LBD, perhaps to foster aold-fashioned family-oriented appeal.

  • Around the same time, voters in Sevierville rejected allowing liquor stores in the city, 785 to 614.  Gatlinburg remains the only city in the tourism-dominated county.

  • Early this year, the Sparta BOMA unanimously approved liquor-by-the-drink (“LBD”) sales.  It appears the measure was approved in order to increase city revenue through the 15% LBD tax (50% of which goes to the city) and through a new annual privilege tax.


Undoubtedly, these, and other locations, will continue to vote on the expansion of liquor sales.  Stayed tuned for future developments in and around your part of the state.

Will Cheek talks about the new TN law that lets bars be bars

Ruble Sanderson, the proprietor of four of Lower Broadway’s iconic honky-tonks, has paid more fines than he can remember over the years for violating the state’s liquor laws.


He chalked it up to the cost of doing business in Tennessee.


The violations had nothing to do with the way he served alcohol or how responsible his wait staff was with customers and were not because he intentionally decided to break the rules, Sanderson said.


Rather, he was cited for not persuading the tourists, night owls and after-dinner crowd who frequent his live music venues to buy more food with their drinks.


Now a new state law is giving Sanderson and other business owners the chance to legally operate their establishments without penalty as they essentially were intended to be: as bars. Saloons, pubs, watering holes, taverns. Until now — and probably unbeknownst to most social drinkers — all were illegal in Tennessee.


"They were stupid and archaic rules that we are glad to see go," said Sanderson, who, along with his wife, Brenda, owns Legends Corner, Second Fiddle, The Stage on Broadway and Nashville Crossroads. "There was this tremendous pressure to get people to buy food. But that’s not why people come to our places."


The new liquor laws, quietly passed last year by state lawmakers, for the first time allow establishments to operate as bars, selling more booze than food.


The old law required food to be the biggest single sales item for any establishment with a liquor license. The new law still requires that food be sold, but new "limited service licenses" give business owners the option of cutting their food sales to as little as 15 percent without breaking the law.


Boost to small clubs


The new rules also allow smaller bars to open for the first time, by lowering the number of seats required in a liquor serving establishment from 75 to 45 and adding bar stools to the seat count.


Thus far, between 40 and 50 establishments in the state have sought the new designation, according to the Alcoholic Beverage Commission, the state agency that issues the licenses.


It’s a small number compared to the 2,700 liquor-by-the-drink establishments in the state, but officials expect more new bars to crop up and point out that hotels, private clubs and single-occasion events also are included in that number.


Most of Nashville’s downtown honky-tonks have made the transition, cutting back on food served to focus on drinks. The seating changes have been a boon for clearing a wider space on their dance floors, too, which previously had to be small enough to accommodate a larger number of seats.


So, what was the first actual bar in Tennessee? The answer: Tribe Restaurant & Night Club in the 1500 block of Church Street, regularly voted at the top of "best gay bar in Nashville" contests.


Small bars are beginning to pop up as well.


Three weeks ago, Jody Myers opened the Neighbors of Sylvan Park bar, squeezed into a narrow space between a hair salon and pet shop.


Before the revamped rules, Myers couldn’t have opened the place.


"I just wanted to open a kind of Cheers for regulars" in the Sylvan Park neighborhood, Myers said. The tab for the new license totaled $4,000, a much steeper license fee than former liquor license fees ranging from $750 to $1,200 under the old rules.


Some small-business owners say they’re concerned about the size of the fee hike.


"I expect this will cause some to go beer only, which ultimately could hurt their competitiveness and possibly put them out of business," said Mervin Louque, a sound engineer who operates the small music and drink venue Douglas Corner Cafe on Eighth Avenue South.


Attorney Will Cheek, who represents food- and liquor-serving establishments, said that most of his clients are getting by a lot cheaper with the new fees.


Enforcement activities by the Alcoholic Beverage Commission had temporarily shut down clients including Buck Wild Saloon and Traxx, establishments patrons would visit after dinner. Other places would routinely pay $4,000 a quarter in fines after ABC audits of their receipts showed food constituted less than 50 percent of their sales, Cheek said.


"The issue just came to a head, and you had a lot of bar owners throwing their support behind each other," Cheek said. "Now, you’ve got a lot of Tennessee icons that can issue a sigh of relief that don’t have to worry that the ABC is breathing down their necks."


David Anthony discusses changes in foreclosure laws

 A 2010 change in foreclosure laws is helping bring some pricing sanity back into the market


Published May 31, 2011 by J.R. Lind


What’s the market value of something when the market isn’t functioning? If there are no buyers — no matter the price — figuring that value can be as impossible as dividing by zero.


When the housing market was hopping along, there was no shortage of buyers when a bank needed to sale a property at foreclosure and any difference between the sale at public outcry and the outstanding amount of the loan could be sought through the court system. If a home with a $500,000 mortgage sold for $400,000, a bank could easily come for the remaining $100,000.


That worked just fine when there are plenty of buyers. But what if, as has happened during this housing crisis, the buyers disappear and the banks are stuck buying back the foreclosed tracts?


The logical answer is that if there is only one bidder — in this case, the banks themselves — the rational choice would be to bid as low as possible and, again, seek the deficiency in the courts.


"When the economy hit the skids, foreclosure sales for a while were getting prices at 20 percent of the loan value — crazy low — and I don’t think that was a function of the real value being 20 percent. We just stopped having a functioning market," said Bob Mendes, a member at MGLaw. "If you are a bank, you have to make a decision: Would you rather bid in at 20 percent and be able to sue for $400,000 deficiency or bid in at 80 percent and sue for $100,000 deficiency?"


In an effort — spearheaded by a reeling development community — to keep bankers from systemically underbidding, the state legislature last year enacted a change in the foreclosure law that has given legal recourse to the borrower. Under a handful of appellate cases, borrowers already had a right to sue if the market value was too low, but as is often the case from court decisions, there were lots of gray areas.


And while the legislature sought to protect the borrowers through legislation, the law may have actually had the opposite effect, said Bone McAllester Norton attorney David Anthony.


"The clarity of the new statute provides an obstacle for attacks on the foreclosure bid price," he said. "In the past, the standard was unclear. Now, it’s a clear test and easier to overcome… The burden is clearly on the debtor to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the property sold for an amount materially less than the fair market value… That’s not an easy standard to meet."


So in a way, the law managed to both benefit and hinder each side in the creditor/defaulted borrower battle.


"Before the law changed, our advice to lenders was, ‘Start the bidding on the low end of the range of market value,’" Mendes said. "Post the law changing, there’s a little more art, because there’s not as many bidders. But under the statute, if you have successfully predicted something in the range of market, you have defended yourself… If we’ve seen any impact, it’s that banks are back to bidding into a price where the market is."


In a recent sale, Mendes said, the bank put up a property for outcry that held a $2.1 million debt. Eventually, the lender bought back the property at $1.5 million, a hefty tag that still left a $600,000 deficiency for the borrower to overcome. A year ago, Mendes said, the bid could have come in "hundreds of thousands of dollars lower."


Anthony said most bankers already were careful to make fair bids, even in the tough economy, in large part because a too-large deficiency might trigger a bankruptcy for the borrower, in which case they would likely not see the money anyway.


What he sees as the major change is the tightening of the statutory window, the time lenders have to seek those deficiencies, from six years to two.


"Bankers are getting tired of these legal fees, so they’d do these foreclosures … and then sit on them. Some banks would even sell the deficiency on the note," Anthony said. "Now you only have two years to sweat it out. Six years is a long time to kick the tires. I think banks are desensitized to chasing down deficiencies, but now they don’t have forever."


Anthony said he wasn’t sure the law was a "gut reaction" to the rash of foreclosures that beset most parts of the country when the housing bubble burst. That affliction has inspired a slew of proposed changes to Tennessee’s foreclosure procedures, the most widely debated of which has been a plan to no longer require that foreclosure notices be printed in newspapers of record.


SouthComm, the parent company of Post, is one of a number of media companies that have hired lobbyists to oppose the change. But, Mendes said, in a normal market, these things become less of a hot-button issue.


"This statute only matters in a historically ridiculous time. As soon as we get back to a functioning economy, bidders will set the price, but in the absence of bidders, banks are," he said. "It’s just brought everybody back to what the norm has always been: Foreclosures should be priced at market value."


Click here for the entire story in the Nashville Post.


 

High Alc Beer Incites Legislative Furor

Many industry members thought that brewing high alc beer was already allowed under state law.  Nashville Brewery Yazoo held a liquor manufacturer’s license and had been brewing a high alc beer named “Sue” for some time.

But the law was not clear and a large brewery looking to locate in Tennessee wanted to clarify state law to specifically allow high alc beer production, before it spent millions of dollars to build a brewery in Tennessee.

Tennessee beer laws are unusual.  In most states and under federal law, beer is beer, regardless of the alcohol content.  Tennessee law caps the amount of alcohol in beer at five percent by weight, which includes almost all popular brands of beer.  Regular beer is sold under a beer permit issued by cities and counties, but high alc beer requires an ABC license.

In recent years, beer aficionados have been increasingly enamored by beer that is stronger than five percent.  This is a growth area for high-end craft breweries.

Seems easy enough.  But in the strange world of Tennessee liquor laws, the clarification about brewing high alc beer caused a firestorm.  Lobbyists descended on the bill and turmoil ensued.

During the final hours of the legislative session, an industry compromise was adopted.  Brewing high alc beer was specifically authorized under a liquor manufacturing license.  Tap rooms can serve pints and sell growlers of both regular and high alc beer.  The law is not perfect, but it legitimizes a practice that is vital to most craft breweries.

Stephen Zralek speaks on the American Dream and is featured in the Tennessean.

American Dream Continues To Draw People Here


When I think of the immigrants joining our community in Middle Tennessee, I think of my own ancestors. I think of the dream they had for their families, and the sacrifices they made so that my life could be better than their own.


My mother’s family came to the United States in the 1700s. Their stories begin long ago and are harder for me to access. My father’s paternal grandparents came to Chicago in the late 1800s, looking for a new life for their family. My great-grandfather worked in the stockyards in Chicago. The father of seven children, he was killed when a meat-hook ripped through his back. His wife, who spoke hardly any English, was offered a mere $100 to settle any claims she may have against the company. She had no one to advocate on her behalf. She needed whatever money she could get.


My grandfather, himself still a boy, had to grow up quickly. As a child, he got a job to help care for the family. He had five children, saw all of them go to college, find meaningful careers and start families of their own. One of them was my father, who moved to Nashville in the 1950s.


This story of arrival is the same story for almost all of us. Our ancestors’ countries of origin and the dates of their arrival may be different, but they all decided to come to this country because of its promise of opportunity — because of the American dream. They all sacrificed so that we could have better lives, and so we could reap the benefits of their hard work.  Today, our great country continues to welcome new arrivals from all parts of the globe. People continue to leave behind everything they know in hope that they can give their children a better life. Some people literally risk their life in order to enter our country.


Once they come here, they start over from square one — with nothing, taking the lowest paying jobs and working some of the hardest jobs. Their economic, social and cultural contributions to our community are immeasurable.


This Thursday, we will honor the contributions of three Latino small-business owners, whose businesses have persevered in the middle of the Great Recession. All three graduated from Conexión Américas’ small-business program, and they contribute to the prosperity of both their families and our entire community. You can join us as we "Change the Conversation" to focus on the contributions made by Latino immigrants on May 26 at the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel at 7:30 a.m.


For more information, visit ConexionAmericas.org.


 

James Crumlin to Present at the Nashville Business Journal’s “HR Summit for a Changing Workplace”

Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Crumlin, along with five other panelists, will present challenges and demands for everyone, from the board and CEO to the entry-level employees at the Nashville Business Journal’s “HR Summit for a Changing Workplace.”


The breakfast and panel discussion will take place beginning at 7:30am on Tuesday, May 17 at the Hutton Hotel.


Click here for more details and to register.


 

Conexion Americas hosts WaterCooler

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WaterCooler Networking Event to Feature Conexión Américas

The next WaterCooler event is set for Monday, May 9, 2011 from 5:30 to 6:30 PM at Conexión Américas.  Co-hosted by Stephen Zralek of Bone McAllester Norton, Renata Soto of Conexión Américas and Wade Munday, WaterCooler is an open invitation, informal networking group for young entrepreneurs.

This month we're headed to Conexión Américas, where we'll hear from Renata Soto, its co-founder (and our great friend and co-founder of WaterCooler).  An example of social entrepreneurialism, Conexión has the mission of "promoting the social, economic and civic advancement of Latino families in Middle Tennessee."  Founded in 2002, it is the "go-to" Latino organization in Nashville, and seen as the authority on Latino issues by civic and business leaders in our community.  Our visit to Conexión Américas comes just after the recent census revealed that over 10% of Nashville's population is Hispanic, and that Nashville has the fastest-growing Latino population of any major city in the country.

We'll also hear from Karla Ruiz, a graduate of Conexión’s small business program, who recently launched her own catering company, and we'll get to taste some of her tapas inspired from her native Mexico.  Karla previously worked at Martha's at the Plantation and at Fido.  If you've been to the West Nashville Farmer's Market in recent weeks, Karla is the one with the long line of folks dying to taste her food.

Around 6:30, we'll head two blocks over to Tavern (on Broadway near 19th) for drinks and more time to catch up.

If you can make it, please let us know by sending an rsvp to Kristi no later than Friday, May 6.

WHO:   Renata Soto, executive director of Conexión Américas, & Karla Ruiz, graduate
WHEN:  Monday, May 9 from  5:30 to 6:30 PM
WHERE: Conexion Americas, 800 18th Ave. South

WaterCooler is an informal networking group for young entrepreneurs in their 20s, 30s and 40s that meets (almost) every month for drinks, networking and the chance to hear vibrant speakers on a variety of topics.  There is no official membership and no dues -- just come when the speaker interests you or you want to meet some new people in Nashville.

WaterCooler began in September 2009 and has featured the following speakers/topics:

April 2011: Darek Bell & Andrew Webber (Corsair Distillery)
March 2011: Mark Rowan (Griffin Technology)
January 2011: Scott Witherow (Olive & Sinclair Chocolate Co): Tour & Tasting
November 2010: Linus Hall (Yazoo Brewing Company): Tour & Tasting
October 2010: Christine Madella (WKRN): "Molding Your Image in a 24/7 World"
September 2010: Ed Nash (Oxford Fine Arts): "The Art of Buying Fine Art"
July 2010: Alan Young (Armor Concepts LLC): "Secrets of Starting a Successful Company"
June 2010: Laura Creekmore (Creekmore Consulting): "Using Social Media as a Young Entrepreneur"
April 2010: Networking for WaterCooler attendees
March 2010: Sid Chambless (Nashville Capital Network): "Investment Capital for Young Entrepreneurs"
February 2010: Bob Bernstein (Bongo Java)/Jose Gonzalez (Belmont): "Entrepreneurship with Heart"
January 2010: Freddie O'Connell (SearchViz): "Search Engine Optimization"
December 2009: Becca Stevens (Magdalene/Thistle Farms): "Walking in Gratitude"
November 2009: Chris Ferrell (SouthComm): "The Changing Delivery of Information"
October 2009: Clint Smith (Emma): "The Art of Everyday Innovation"
September 2009: Kimberly Pace (Owen School): "Personal Marketing"


 

Video: Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone.  My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel. 

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Last night was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen.  With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media."  We had a great crowd and a good conversation.  For a link to the video, go here





Video: Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone.  My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel. 

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Last night was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen.  With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media."  We had a great crowd and a good conversation.  For a link to the video, go here





WaterCooler goes to Corsair Distillery for Exclusive Tasting & Tour

 
If you missed the last WaterCooler, you missed a great event!  Nashville's only distillery, Corsair, gave us a behind-the-scenes tour of how they make and distill what is quickly becoming one of the most sought-after small batch liquors in the U.S. when they hosted us in April 2011.
Located in Marathon Village, which used to house Yazoo Brewery, Corsair had to work mighty hard to even get up and running in Tennessee.
Darek Bell

Because Tennessee's laws and Nashville's laws were so onerous, Corsair actually began in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Only after they were able to convince the state and local lawmakers to allow them to "manufacture intoxicating liquors" were they able to come back home.
As part of a private event for WaterCooler, co-owners Darek Bell and Andrew Webber showed us around, told the story behind Corsair, and gave us samples in their tasting room.  The Tennessean just reported that members of the public won't get this same opportunity until the laws are changed.
Andrew Webber
To join the invitation list and receive news about upcoming WaterCooler events, shoot me an email. Thanks to everyone who showed up.  See you at the next on on May 9 at Conexion Americas!

Here are some photos from WaterCooler at Corsair:












Video on Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone. My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel.

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Speaking at Lipscomb was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen. With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media." We had a great crowd and a good conversation. Here's a few minutes from my presentation that we recorded.



Video on Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone. My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel.

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Speaking at Lipscomb was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen. With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media." We had a great crowd and a good conversation. Here's a few minutes from my presentation that we recorded.