In The News

Charles W. Bone Reads to First Grade Class at Robert Churchwell Magnet Elementary

Charles W Bone reads Dr. Seuss to Robert Churchwel Museum Magnet ElementaryCharles W. Bone reads Dr. Seuss to Robert Churchwel Museum Magnet Elementary

First grade teacher, Crystal Hicks, invited Bone McAllester Norton attorney, Charles W. Bone, to read to her class at Robert Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary in honor of Dr. Seuss’ birthday. Bone read to the class of 18 students Oh the Places You Will Go. The children were eager to meet their special guest today.

We applaud Ms. Hicks for coordinating over 100 community members and leaders to read to the children this week alone. Bone was grateful for the opportunity to join Ms. Hicks in her efforts to remember and celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Seuss.


Charles W. Bone Robert Certificate from Churchwell Museum Magnet Elementary


Alex Little Named to Nashville Business Journal “40 Under 40”

Alex Little Attorney at Bone McAllester Norton Professional indexWe are proud of Bone McAllester Norton attorney Alex Little named one of Nashville Business Journal’s 2018 40 under 40 winners. This list distinguishes Nashville’s thriving men and women that strive to keep Music City business community successful and flourishing, and they’re under the age of 40. This is the 10th year the Nashville Business Journal has hosted this program and we are honored to be a part of it.

You can review the full class of 2018 40 under 40 list here.

Bone McAllester Norton Adds Two High Profile Litigators

Two highly accomplished local attorneys with clients across Tennessee have joined the Nashville law firm of Bone McAllester Norton PLLC.

Samuel L. Jackson and Emily Harper Mack have renowned reputations and extensive experience providing quality legal representation to public and private school boards, universities, and other employers.

Samuel L Jackson Attorney at Bone McAllester Norton Professional indexSamuel L. JacksonThey routinely advise education clients on a wide variety of legal matters, including Title IX compliance, internal and agency investigations, administrative proceedings, special education and disability accommodations, personnel concerns, student rights and discipline, along with other legal matters that are unique to educational institutions.

Sam and Emily also regularly represent public and private employers in federal and state courts and in administrative proceedings before federal and state agencies on a variety of claims. Their experience includes wrongful discharge, retaliation, discrimination and harassment. With this litigation background, Sam and Emily are seasoned at counseling employers on matters involving employee discipline, workplace investigations, leaves of absence, and other labor and employment issues.

Emily Harper Mack Attorney at Bone McAllester Norton Professional indexEmily Harper Mack“We are thrilled to have Sam and Emily join our firm. Given their high quality work, client satisfaction, and community involvement, they are an ideal fit for what we are doing in Middle Tennessee and across Tennessee,” said Charles Robert Bone, President and CEO of Bone McAllester Norton PLLC. Randy Frazier, the Director of Schools for the Weakley County Board of Education, a longtime client of Sam and Emily, said, “Our Board is excited that Sam Jackson and Emily Mack will continue to serve as our legal counsel with their new firm, Bone McAllester Norton PLLC.

During my 9-year tenure as Director of Schools, Sam and Emily have represented our board in legal matters. They have displayed an expertise in all areas of school law. Their performance and service to our Board has been outstanding.”

Jackson and Mack practiced law together at Lewis Thomason in Nashville before joining Bone McAllester Norton.

Bone McAllester Norton, an entrepreneurial law firm of 40 attorneys with offices in Nashville and Sumner and Williamson Counties, provides a wide range of legal services to its clients. Bone McAllester has a long history of representing clients in the education arena, creating an exceptional synergy with Sam Jackson and Emily Mack’s law practice. Over the years, attorneys at the Bone firm have accumulated significant experience in representing school systems, private universities and colleges throughout Tennessee. Bone McAllester Norton focuses on 18 distinct practice areas, including litigation, banking and commercial lending, corporate and securities transactions, mergers and acquisitions, intellectual property, labor and employment and environmental, along with a full breadth of legal services typically required by businesses and individuals.

Bone McAllester Norton Marquee Sponsor for Local Rivalry Hendersonville High School versus Station Camp Boys Basketball Game

BMN HHS v. StationCamp T shirt SponsorBone McAllester Norton PLLC was a marquee sponsor for the Hendersonville High School basketball game versus Station Camp on December 9 th . This local, rival game always draws a large crowd from the community including Bonelaw attorney Marty Cook whose son, Carson, is a member of the Hendersonville High School basketball team. Carson is a part-time employee at the Bone McAllester Norton Hendersonville office. Hendersonville Basketball t-shirts were printed for the game with the Bone McAllester Norton logo on the back.

The Hendersonville High School team wore the t-shirts during warm-ups. When the team roster was announced, the players tossed the t-shirts into the crowd. The cheerleaders also threw t-shirts into the crowd during timeouts. Throughout both the Varsity and Junior Varsity game, Bone McAllester Norton PLLC was featured on the scoreboard.

Bone McAllester Norton was proud to be the marquee sponsor for this local high school rivalry and we are always proud to support our local schools.

James Crumlin Recognized for Best Free Community Workout in Nashville and Second Best Ambassador to Nashville’s Health and Fitness Community

James A Crumlin Jr Attorney at Bone McAllester Norton Professional indexJames A. Crumlin Jr.On January 3rd, 2018 Bone McAllester Norton’s attorney, James Crumlin was recognized for hosting the Best Free Community Workout in Nashville of 2017 by Nashville Fit Magazine. “Capitol Steps Workout” meets every Monday and Thursday at 6pm. Here you will find James leading a group through a challenging workout session that will push their limits. The participants form a community that keeps the group encouraged and ready for the challenge. All are welcome to join the fun, free of cost, no matter their skill level.

Crumlin was also recognized as the second Best Ambassador to Nashville’s Health and Fitness Community. When receiving the recognition, Crumlin said, “I am blessed beyond measure and so grateful for your continued support! There are SO many people to thank. I humbly thank and so appreciate everyone who helps/has helped with, attends/has attended the workouts over the last 5 ½ years. Without YOU, there would be no Capitol Steps Workout.”

We are proud of the many ways James serves and leads our community through Bone McAllester Norton and from the steps of the capitol building.

James Crumlin Best Free Community Workout

James Crumlin on Instagram bio instagram icon

Bone McAllester Norton Attorneys Recognized as Healthcare Leaders

In January’s Nashville Medical News magazine, “2018 In Charge Health Care,” Bone McAllester Norton attorneys Anne Sumpter Arney and Stacey Garrett Koju are recognized as leaders – “leaders who keep Music City’s $84 billion healthcare industry humming along.”

Anne Sumpter Arney Attorney at Bone McAllester Norton Professional indexAnne Sumpter ArneyWith over 30 years of experience, Anne Arney continues to work with healthcare companies and medical professionals on a wide variety of legal matters. She advises her healthcare clients on business law and transactional issues, as well as assisting them in navigating ever-changing healthcare laws and regulations. Anne regularly counsels both healthcare and non-healthcare entrepreneurs who are seeking to start, grow, operate, and sell their businesses. She publishes the “Physicians’ Legal Update” newsletter to help her clients stayed informed on legal matters.

Stacey Garrett Koju Attorney at Bone McAllester Norton Professional indexStacey Garrett KojuStacey Garrett Koju is a founding member of Bone McAllester Norton PLLC and serves as the chair of the firm’s board of directors. Stacey concentrates her practice in the areas of healthcare, higher education, labor and employment, and corporate transactions. Stacey’s clients include physicians, medical practice groups, and other healthcare entities. She is currently a board member of Abe’s Garden, National Museum of African American Music, and Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Inc., and also serves as chair of Leadership Tennessee’s Advisory Council.

We are grateful for the hard work and service Anne Arney and Stacey Koju provide to Bone McAllester Norton and the Nashville community.

Learn more - Bone Law - Healthcare Law

17th Annual MLK Fellowship Breakfast

Nashville, Tenn. (January 15, 2018) – Nashville law firm Bone McAllester Norton PLLC hosted its 17th Annual Fellowship Breakfast on Monday, honoring the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The event was held at the historic Woolworth on 5th, one of several lunch counters desegregated in 1960 by a group of Nashville students. Nearly 600 gathered to hear from guest artists, speakers, and community leaders on the history of Woolworth, Nashville’s role in the fight for social justice in 1960, and the call for justice today. 
Stacey Garrett Koju and Charles W. Bone, co-founders of the law firm, welcomed the guests and laid the groundwork for the morning’s program, entitled Woolworth Speaks – Nashville: On the Frontlines for Social Justice, Then and Now. They compared today’s environment surrounding social justice to the challenges of the civil rights movement in the 1960’s.
Stacey Garrett Koju and Charles W BoneStacey Garrett Koju & Charles W. Bone 17th Annual MLK Fellowship Breakfast 201817th Annual MLK Fellowship Breakfast 2018 Woolworth on 5th in Nashville TennesseeWoolworth on 5th in Nashville Tennessee
The event began with the Negro spirituals, “Lean On Me” and “A Change is Gonna Come,” sung by Charles “Wigg” Walker. The songs reminded the audience of how time has passed, but hope persists in the waiting: “It’s been a long, a long time coming / But I know a change is gonna come, oh yes it will.”
Following Mr. Walker, Charles Robert Bone introduced Mayor Megan Barry, who has been a guest speaker at each MLK Fellowship Breakfast since her election in 2015. In her address, Mayor Barry reminded the audience that the future of Nashville and the future of our Nation rest in the hands of the children, teenagers, and young adults – just as many of the leaders of the civil rights movement were college-age students. She challenged the guests to take advantage of opportunities to mentor and invest in the young adults and children in their lives.
The first keynote speaker, Dr. Reavis L. Mitchell Jr., a history professor at Fisk University, addressed the history of Nashville’s place on the frontline for social justice. Dr. Mitchell drew to light the relevancy and existence of racism today. He said, “Racism has an ugly side, a continuing side that is still a part of the human tradition.” Dr. Mitchell’s comment begs the question, “What are our lunch counters today?” Dr. King’s legacy only continues through those who are willing to take a stand for justice.
Tom MoralesTom Morales Charles Robert Bone Roxanne Bethune Dwanna Hughes Barry ScottCharles Robert Bone - Roxanne Bethune - Dwanna Hughes - Barry Scott Charles W BoneCharles W. Bone
Tom Morales, developer of Woolworth on 5th, then introduced his childhood friend, actor, writer, and motivational speaker Barry Scott. Mr. Scott performed a modern interpretation of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.’s speech, “I Have a Dream.” Mr. Scott’s powerful interpretation drew on the heartfelt emotions of the civil rights movement. He charged the audience to remember the purpose of the movement. He repeatedly said, “All reality hinges on moral foundation,” which left the audience asking the questions, “What do I believe? And what reality are my beliefs creating?”
Following Barry Scott, Reverend Becca Stevens, author, speaker, and founder of Thistle Farms, reminded the audience of the call placed upon every individual life. She quoted Micah 6:8, “…what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?” Rev. Stevens shared that justice is unattainable without the willingness to say, “Here I am, God, use me.” In order to continue the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., one must remember the call to love the marginalized, see beyond what the world sees, and say “yes” to the uncomfortable lifestyle justice demands.
Barry ScottBarry Scott Frankie Henry - Dr Mitchell - King Hollands - Stacey Garrett Koju and Rip PattonFrankie Henry - Dr Mitchell - King Hollands - Stacey Garrett Koju and Rip Patton Charles Robert BoneCharles Robert Bone
The final keynote speaker was Dr. Ernest “Rip” Patton. Dr. Patton was one of the many students who participated in the lunch counter sit-ins, Freedom Riders, and other protests of segregation. He honored sit-in participants who were present at the event - Frankie Henry, King and Mary Ellen Hollands, and others in the crowd who stood to signify their participation. Dr. Patton spoke of the bravery of the participants, who were willing to sacrifice their lives for this beloved cause. He talked about the methods and intentionality of the sit-ins, which required hard work. Everyone who participated in the movement had a different role, but of equal importance. Today when celebrating the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights movement leaders, it is often forgotten that the glory of the ‘60s was marked by blood, humility, and unwavering determination. It was only because of the unified conviction for a better life that the lunch counters became desegregated. Every day was filled with collaboration, sacrifice, and hard work. Dr. Patton urged the crowd to remember that a better tomorrow begins with a better today: “The time is always right to do what is right” (Martin Luther King Jr.).
Dr. Patton closed the program with a moving benediction and song that was often sung in the ‘60s by participants in the civil rights movement, “I Woke Up This Morning with My Mind Stayed on Freedom.”
View additional coverage of this event below:

Your Survival Guide to DUI Roadblocks in Tennessee

Zack Lawson Attorney at Bone McAllester NortonZack Lawson Attorney at Bone McAllester NortonAfter the New Year’s Eve ball drops and the confetti falls, thousands of Tennesseans will file out of the establishment of their choice and pile into a vehicle. As you put 2017 in your rear view, don’t be surprised to see blue lights in front of you on your way home. Every year, law enforcement officers set up DUI roadblocks on New Year’s Eve. At these roadblocks, police will legally stop you without any cause or suspicion. Given the strict penalties for DUI offenses in Tennessee, the stakes are high.

Unless you like jail and hate money, keep the following in mind:

  1. Don’t be dumb—use your smartphone: As you leave your New Year’s Eve gathering, it will be 2018—act like it. Use your smartphone. If you have been drinking, catch a ride using the app of your choice. If that’s not an option, call a friend or a cab. It just simply isn’t worth the risk. The best way to avoid getting arrested at a DUI checkpoint is to not drive through a DUI checkpoint.

  2. Don’t be a hero—roll down your window: You’ve probably seen some videos online of people “owning” the police by “knowing their rights.” Often, these people have no idea what they’re talking about. Some of them refuse to roll down their window in an effort to “exercise their rights.” You have to roll down your window. If you don’t, you’ll likely have to buy a new window after your buddy bails you out of jail.

  3. Don’t try to get chummy: You have the right not to say anything at all. This doesn’t mean they can’t ask questions. If you want questioning to stop, you must unequivocally state that you are exercising your right to remain silent. If you choose to speak, don’t try to chum it up with the officer. Officers are trained professionals. They will be doing their job, and their job is to arrest people for DUI. The more you talk, the more likely they are to believe they smell alcohol on your breath and that your speech is slurred.

  4. Present requested documentation: As with any traffic stop, if you’re pulled over at a DUI roadblock, you are required to provide your license and registration. Probable cause is not a prerequisite to checking your ID. Pro tip: Before you reach for your glove box or console for these items, ask permission from the officer. This will signal to the officer that you intend to be cooperative while also keeping you safe.

  5. If requested, step out of the vehicle: A common misconception is that police must have probable cause before they can require you to step out of the vehicle. In reality, officers have wide discretion in taking safety precautions. This includes asking you step out of your vehicle. This does not mean you are under arrest.

  6. Refuse field tests: Although officers sometimes lead drivers to believe they will be free to go if they pass a field sobriety test, this is usually not the case. Typically, field sobriety tests are a no-win situation. They are designed to be confusing and to be failed. And passing a test will usually just result in more tests until you make enough mistakes to warrant an arrest. Plus, aside from breath, urine, and blood tests, there is no consequence to refusal.

  7. Refuse searches: Never consent to a search. Ever. Don’t be fooled by an officer’s friendly demeanor. There is nothing to be gained.

  8. Call a lawyer: Just because DUI roadblocks can be constitutional does not mean they are always constitutional. The roadblock must comply with certain criteria, and the officers must comply with a myriad of laws, rules, and procedures. If you are arrested, you should contact a lawyer as soon as possible to make sure your arrest was lawful and all your rights are protected.

Stay tuned for more information that digs deeper into each of these topics in addition to other subjects. If you have a question or you are arrested, call Zack Lawson directly at 615-238-6332 or reach him by twitter @Zack__Law.

Yarbrough Receives 2017 Nashville Bar Association CLE Excellence Award


Edward M Yarbrough Attorney at Bone McAllester NortonEdward M. Yarbrough During the Nashville Bar Association’s 2017 annual celebration, Bonelaw’s Ed Yarbrough was honored with the prestigious CLE Excellence Award. The CLE Excellence Award identifies a Nashville Bar member who has demonstrated commitment to the NBA's mission. The Nashville Bar Association is dedicated to the continuation of quality legal education. Ed Yarbrough’s exceptional service to the NBA has paved the way for historical breakthrough for attorneys, community leaders, and civilians.

Yarbrough’s experience on the murder case of Marcia Trimble in 1975 played a key role in producing some of the 2017 CLE seminars. In addition, Mr. Yarbrough’s expertise heavily influenced the development of past programs regarding Baker v. Carr, HOFFA!, and Blanton. These seminars not only provide attorneys with the needed resources to enhance their legal practice and professionalism, but also educate our community on important historical legal events in Tennessee. The seminars are available for the public online.

“We are very thankful of the ways Mr. Yarbrough has supported and strengthened our CLE program at the Nashville Bar Association,” said Monica Mackie, Executive Director of the NBA.

For more than 40 years, Yarbrough has successfully led a trial law practice in Nashville. He is well known for his past experience as U.S. Attorney and as a state and federal prosecutor. Yarbrough now focuses his practice on criminal defense and government investigations, and handles civil litigation for plaintiffs and defendants.

Bonelaw Client Lane College Hosts Tennessee Supreme Court

Bonelaw Client Lane College Hosts Tennessee Supreme CourtLeft to right - Peter C. Woolfolk, President & CEO of Communication Strategies Dr. Logan C. Hampton, President of Lane College James A. Crumlin, Jr., Bone McAllester NortonThe Tennessee Supreme Court met on November 30 at longtime Bone McAllester Norton client Lane College to hear oral arguments in two criminal cases.  The court presided at the Jackson, Tennessee college as part of the SCALES (Supreme Court Advancing Legal Education for Students) project.  The project, which has been operational for over twenty years, has allowed hundreds of students to gain first-hand knowledge of the Tennessee legal system and the function of the appellate courts.  James A. Crumlin, Jr., who leads the Bonelaw team representing Lane College, attended the reception sponsored by Bone McAllester Norton that followed the day’s events.  More than 100 connected to the state-wide program appeared at the event, including Tennessee Supreme Court Justices and many state and local dignitaries.  Lane College is the first Historically Black College or University to host the event.

Additional information about the day as well as about the SCALES project can be found at these links:

Lane College hosts high court cases, The Jackson Sun

The SCALES Project

The two cases included:

  • Tommy Nunley v. State of Tennessee - This case reaches the Court after both the trial court and Court of Criminal Appeals denied the petitioner’s request to reopen his case based on alleged newly discovered evidence.  The Court will consider whether the trial court correctly treated the petition for writ of error coram nobis as a petition for DNA testing and whether the petitioner is entitled to coram nobis relief on the ground that the State withheld exculpatory evidence.  In addition to these two issues raised by petitioner, the Court requested the parties address whether the Court of Criminal Appeals should have affirmed the trial court’s summary dismissal of the petitioner’s coram nobis petition as barred by the statute of limitations.
  • Tiffinne Wendalyn Gail Runions, Individually and on behalf of her minor child, Laileean Wendalee Scott v. Jackson-Madison County General Hospital District, et al. - This case comes to the Court by way of an interlocutory appeal. The Supreme Court granted review of this case in order to determine whether the trial court correctly granted the plaintiff’s motion to amend her complaint in order to substitute as a party defendant Jackson-Madison County General Hospital District in place of Bolivar General Hospital, Inc.