In The News

Bonelaw Client Studio Bank Takes Steps Towards Formation

Congratulations to our client, Studio Bank (In Organization), whose incorporators this week filed notice with the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions of its intent to apply for a banking charter.

Charles W. Bone, Trace Blankenship, and Chris Raybeck, members of Bone McAllester Norton’s Corporate and Banking/Financial Services teams, serve as corporate counsel to the new bank in organization and have been working closely with Aaron J. Dorn and the other founders for over a year on this exciting new chapter in the history of Tennessee’s banking industry. Among other things, the Bone McAllester team has provided guidance to the founders on strategic matters, board composition and governance, securities offerings and capitalization, and real estate negotiations. This is the first regulatory filing in the process of becoming a bank and opening their doors for business. Studio Bank (In Organization) would be the first true de novo headquartered in Nashville since 2008 – one that is not part of a corporate reorganization, merger or acquisition.

Bone McAllester Norton’s banking and financial services group has a diversified and comprehensive financial services practice representing all types of financial institutions and working with management on virtually any business issue that a financial institution may encounter. Our lawyers have been providing advice to banks, bank holding companies, mortgage companies, and all types of financial institutions throughout Tennessee and the southeast for some 40 years.

Learn more about our Banking and Financial Services group.

To read more about the future of Studio Bank (In Organization) click on these links:

Pat Emery and Matt Kisber among organizers of Nashville's Studio Bank", The Tennessean, August 24, 2017

It's official: Nashville's upstart bank files notice with regulators", Nashville Business Journal, August 24, 2017

Studio Bank founder rolls out big-name board", Nashville Post, August 24, 2017

Super Lawyers Honors 15 Bone McAllester Norton Attorneys

Mid-South Super Lawyers List Includes Outstanding Attorneys with High-Degree of Peer Recognition and Professional Achievement

Nashville, Tenn.—(November 5, 2014) The 2014 Mid-South Super Lawyers ratings of outstanding lawyers was released today, and 15 Bone McAllester Norton attorneys were included. Eleven were named as Mid-South Super Lawyers, while four were included as Mid-South Rising Stars.

“Our attorneys pride themselves on a thorough understanding of our client’s objectives and then focus on coming to creative, strategic solutions,” said Charles W. Bone, founder and chairman of Bone McAllester Norton PLLC. “I believe that’s why our peers have chosen more than a dozen of our attorneys for awards like this. We are grateful to them for observing the expertise and passion behind what we do.”

Mid-South Super Lawyers are selected through a multi-phased process, which includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations. The list is produced by Super Lawyers, a national rating service that includes more than 70 practice areas.

Super Lawyers also selects attorneys to be included in its Rising Stars list, which is compiled using the same requirements and selection process as the Super Lawyers list. However, to be eligible for inclusion in Rising Stars, a candidate must be either 40 years old or younger or in practice for no more than 10 years.

The 11 Mid-South Super Lawyers are:

  • Charles Robert Bone, business litigation;

  • John P. Branham (of counsel), business litigation;

  • Larry W. Bridgesmith (of counsel), labor and employment law;

  • C. David Briley, personal injury: plaintiff;

  • James A. Crumlin, Jr., labor and employment law;

  • Sharon (Sheri) O. Jacobs, environmental law;

  • Anne C. Martin, employment litigation: defense;

  • Sam (Mac) J. McAllester, III, real estate law;

  • Bryan E. Pieper, business litigation;

  • Edward M. Yarbrough, criminal defense;

  • Stephen J. Zralek, intellectual property litigation.


The four Mid-South Rising Stars are:

  • David M. Anthony, bankruptcy law;

  • Alex Little, criminal defense;

  • Andrea P. Perry, real estate law;

  • Chris Raybeck, banking.


For more information about these awards, visit http://www.superlawyers.com/. For more information about Bone McAllester Norton, visit http://bonelaw.com/.

 

About Bone McAllester Norton PLLC

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 40 attorneys and offices in Nashville, Sumner and Williamson counties, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 18 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment and environmental matters. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, visit www.bonelaw.com.

# # #


Media Contact:

Ann Dee McClane, (615) 742-6889

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Sean Kirk, Chris Raybeck will Serve as Faculty at The Southeastern School of Banking

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys Sean C. Kirk and Chris Raybeck have been selected to serve on the faculty of The Southeastern School of Banking, held by the Tennessee Bankers Association, this year. Both attorneys are members of the firm’s Banking and Financial Services practice. Their session is in the second-year track and will focus on ethics in banking, covering ethical norms in the financial services industry, including legal standards and conflicts of interest.

Their session will take place at 9:15 a.m. on Tuesday, July 22nd in McWhorter Hall on the campus of Belmont University.

The Southeastern School of Banking (TSSB) is an intensive general banking school consisting of two one-week resident sessions over two years. The first- and second-year sessions are held concurrently. Serving bankers since its organization in 1939, the school’s 80-hour, intermediate-level curriculum focuses on critical banking functions, their interrelationships and determinants of profitability. Analytical skills and management techniques are developed, along with an understanding of the commercial bank’s role in the changing financial services industry. The school’s rigorous admission criteria ensure that students will be able to keep pace with the level of instruction. TSSB’s honor program recognizes students in the top 10 percent of the class and notifies their chief executive officers of their exemplary work. Each year, students receive a comprehensive school manual which serves as a convenient reference after graduation when practical issues or questions arise.

For more, click here.

 

 

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 38 attorneys and offices in Nashville and Sumner County, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 17 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment and environmental matters. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, visit www.bonelaw.com.

From What Every HR Department Needs to Know to Restaurant Openings, Bonelaw Has the Latest Updates

Bone McAllester Norton has important updates and announcements to share with you, our valued clients and friends, in our latest newsletter. Click here to read about the impact a recent lawsuit could have on common severance agreement language, how our Alcoholic Beverage Law group opened two high-end restaurants in Memphis, awards and accolades our attorneys have been given and our involvement with Habitat for Humanity.

Prime Colorants Sold in Multi-Million Dollar Deal

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys Trace Blankenship, Chris Raybeck, Sheri Jacobs and Rick Nickels recently represented Franklin-based Prime Colorants in a $15 million acquisition by Ohio-headquartered A. Schulman Inc. Prime Colorants produces custom colors and additive concentrates for the automobile and construction industries, two sectors in which A. Schulman Inc. did not have capacity. Prime Colorants has approximately 50 employees and has been in business for 38 years.

Read more about this purchase from the Nashville Post here and the full press release here.

 

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 37 attorneys and offices in Nashville and Sumner County, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 17 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment, environmental matters, criminal defense and government investigations and labor and employment. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, call 615-238-6300 or visit www.bonelaw.com.

Winter 2013 Newsletter Features Super Lawyers, New Attorneys and an MLK Save-the-Date

2013 has been a tremendous year for Bone McAllester Norton, and we have you, our valued clients and friends, to thank. Our latest newsletter has important updates and announcements, including new attorneys and a save-the-date for our annual MLK Fellowship Breakfast.

Click here to read more.

Twelve Bone McAllester Norton Attorneys are Named 2013 “Mid-South Super Lawyers”

News Release


Friday – November 8, 2013


Contact: Elizabeth Fielding (615) 321-3110, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nashville, TN – The 2013 Mid-South Super Lawyers list was released today, and 12 Bone McAllester Norton PLLC attorneys were included. Eight have been named as Mid-South Super Lawyers, while four have been included as Mid-South Rising Stars.


Mid-South Super Lawyers are selected through a multi-phased process, which includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations. The list is produced by Super Lawyers, a national rating service that includes more than 70 practice areas.

Super Lawyers also selects attorneys to be included in the Rising Stars list, which is compiled using the same requirements and selection process as the Super Lawyers list. However, to be eligible for inclusion in Rising Stars, a candidate must be either 40 years old or younger, or in practice for 10 years or less.

The eight attorneys named to the 2013 Mid-South Super Lawyers list include:


    • James A. Crumlin, Jr., who made the list for Employment & Labor. He concentrates his practice in the areas of labor and employment law, small and mid-sized business representation and corporate business litigation.

    • Sharon O. Jacobs, an attorney with environmental litigation experience at the federal, state and local levels, made the list for Environmental law.

    • Anne C. Martin was selected for Employment Litigation Defense. She is a commercial litigation and employment lawyer, representing both employers and employees.

    • Sam J. McAllester, III represents financial institutions and concentrates his practice in the areas of commercial lending, creditors’ rights and financial consultations. He was named to the list for Real Estate law.

    • Edward M. Yarbrough, a successful trial lawyer for more than 40 years, focuses his practice on defending major criminal cases, helps clients with government investigations and handles civil litigation for plaintiffs and defendants.

    • Stephen J. Zralek made the Super Lawyers list for IP Litigation. Mr. Zralek assists clients with resolving sensitive, high-profile disputes through intellectual property litigation, business litigation and entertainment litigation.



Bone McAllester Norton’s two of-counsel attorneys also made the list:


    • John P. Branham, a civil trial lawyer whose practice focuses on business litigation and plaintiff’s personal injury litigation, made the list for Business Litigation.

    • Larry W. Bridgesmith was selected for the Super Lawyers list under Employment & Labor. Mr. Bridgesmith has more than 30 years of legal experience in dispute resolution and innovative workplace strategies.



The four attorneys with Bone McAllester Norton named to the 2013 Mid-South Rising Stars list include:

  • David M. Anthony, for Bankruptcy Law. Mr. Anthony concentrates his practice in the areas of bankruptcy, commercial litigation, creditors’ rights, construction and lien litigation.

  • Charles Robert Bone, whose practice includes transactions, corporate governance, small businesses and entrepreneurs. He was selected to the list for Business Litigation.

  • Andrea P. Perry, for Real Estate Law. Ms. Perry also practices law in commercial lending, general corporate, entertainment and tax-exempt organizations.

  • Chris Raybeck, who represents clients in commercial real estate and commercial lending transactions, business acquisitions, company formation and governance matters. He made the list for Banking Law.


For more information about these awards and the law firm, visit www.bonelaw.com.

About Bone McAllester Norton PLLC

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 37 attorneys and offices in Nashville and Sumner County, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 17 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment, environmental matters, criminal defense and government investigations and labor and employment. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, call 615-238-6300 or visit www.bonelaw.com.

Chris Raybeck Speaks to the Nashville Business Journal on Managing Growth

Bone McAllester Norton attorney Chris Raybeck was interviewed by the Nashville Business Journal last week on managing growth and was asked when he knows it is time to add staff. “If the value of opportunities that your instinct tells you are missed, or if the cost of unfilled demand is greater than the cost of hiring, it is time to add staff members.”

Chris will serve as a panelist at this Thursday’s Entrepreneur Exchange and will discuss ways to ramp up your business.

Read more from the Nashville Business Journal on adding staff here.

 

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 33 attorneys and offices in Nashville and Sumner County, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 16 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment and environmental matters.  Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, visit www.bonelaw.com.

Join Chris Raybeck at the Entrepreneur Exchange on May 9

Bone McAllester Norton is pleased to sponsor the second installment of this year's Entrepreneur Panel Series with the Nashville Business Journal. The panel will feature a lively discussion from our own Chris Raybeck and four other successful entrepreneurs who started their businesses right here in Nashville. Click here to read the newsletter.

Attorney Chris Raybeck Closes Company Purchase

Chris Raybeck was instrumental in this company purchase. Omega Apparel Incorporated is now Military Veteran Owned
SMITHVILLE, Jun 15, 2012 - Smithville, TN based Omega Apparel Incorporated was recently acquired by Brentwood, TN resident Dean Wegner. Dean is a 1993 graduate of West Point and a 7-year Army helicopter pilot and Army Ranger veteran. He was most recently a Business Development Executive for Mars Inc. and formerly with Procter & Gamble. Dean acquired the business from former owners Richard Chase and Brian Roberge. Richard and Brian are 45+ year veterans in the apparel industry. They owned Omega Apparel for 18-years and built a best-in-class reputation for Quality and Customer Service that provides a tremendous platform for future growth. Dean brings a pro-growth mindset to Omega Apparel with the goal of acquiring additional business to enable job creation in Smithville and Middle Tennessee. Richard and Brian will remain on Omega’s Advisory Board of Directors for 3-years to provide strategic guidance and maintain the company bedrock of Quality and Customer Service. All current employees of Omega Apparel will remain in place and there will be no changes in key staff and leadership. Dean is committed to job creation and investing in the Smithville community. Russ Brue, a former Finance Manager with Mars Petcare will join as the new CFO. Omega Apparel Incorporated is a leading producer of uniforms for the Department of Defense. The company specializes in making dress pants and skirts for the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines. The production facility is based in Smithville, TN and employs a workforce of 200+.

Chris Raybeck featured in UT Law Best of the Best

The Volunteer spirit is strong in Chris Raybeck (LAW '03), in more ways than one.



 

Chris Raybeck featured in UT Law Best of the Best

The Volunteer spirit is strong in Chris Raybeck (LAW '03), in more ways than one.

 

August 2011 Newsletter Features Legislative Recap of Beer and Liquor Laws.

The Bone McAllester Norton Alcoholic Beverage Group has kindly published a legislative recap to help you stay aware of beer and liquor laws.  To read the rest of our newsletter click here.

July 13, 2011 Newsletter Features Recap of Beer and Liquor Legislation

The Bone McAllester Norton Alcoholic Beverage Group has kindly published a legislative recap to help you stay aware of beer and liquor laws.  To read the rest of our newsletter click here.

Changes to TABC Regulations

The TABC revised regulations governing all liquor licensees.  Our Alcoholic Beverage Group is pleased to highlight the major changes for you.  Grouped by the license held, the summaries should not replace consultation or full review.  Contact Will Cheek or Chris Raybeck with questions.

General Applicability—All Types of Licensees





  • Responsible Vendor Mitigation Program:  The TABC has established an informal program for licensees, similar to that of the responsible vendor for beer retailers.  Licensees following the program may have fines alleviated (by up to half) for any citations.  The program requires a written policy that all employees complete a course in alcohol awareness (including training on applicable laws and regulations) and annual refresher courses.


  • Prior Approval of Advertisements:  In most cases, prior TABC approval of advertising copy is no longer necessary.


Liquor-by-the-Drink (“LBD”) and Catering

  • Advertising.  The ABC eliminated the rules prohibiting advertising happy hour and drink prices.  Licensees may now advertise both, provided the happy hour on liquor ends at 10:00 p.m. and the drink price covers the cost of the ingredients.  Outside signs and billboards may advertise the name of a licensed establishment and the name of a particular brand of alcohol, as long as the LBD licensee pays for the advertising.  Also, availability of alcoholic beverages can be advertised on radio and TV, subject to the same restrictions imposed on other types of licensees.

  • Marketing.  While licensees are still prohibited from giving away alcohol, the term “give” has been refined by replacing the word “drink” with “alcoholic beverage or wine.”  Also, LBD licensees have been removed from the regulation restricting advertising novelties and specialties to consumers, broadening the types of items LBD licensees may give to customers.

  • Managers:  The TABC has specified that new managers and assistant managers have seven days to submit questionnaires to the TABC or face a citation.  Also, all managers and assistant managers should expect to need their own server permits, if they supervise those who serve alcohol.

  • Seating:  The TABC has specified that seats at bars will be counted toward the minimum 75-seat restaurant requirement if the bar is big enough and if meals are regularly served there.  Patio seating that is not heated and cooled year-round will not count toward the minimum seating requirement but will count toward the seat count for license fees.

  • Server Permits:  Temporary server permits will no longer be issued.  Also, LBD licensees must have available for review documentation of the date of hire (dated employment application, dated W-4, etc.) of all servers and managers on premises.  Without it, it will be assumed the employee has been working for more than 61 days.

  • Changing Locations:  For LBD licensees who want to change locations, an abbreviated application process is now available.

  • Catering.  For the first time, there are regulations explicitly governing catering licensees.


Retail Licensees (Off-Premises Consumption)

  • Direct Mail:  Retailers now only need a written request authorizing direct mail, eliminating the requirement of signing the request on–premises.  The rules require removal of recipients within 30 days of the second request to remove.

  • Donations to 501(c)(3) Organizations:  Retailers are authorized to make withdrawals from inventory for donations to non-profits with 501(c)(3) exempt status.

  • Tastings / Consumer Education:  Written notification to the TABC is required for tastings where the retailer hosts, sponsors, or provides an employee to work at the tasting (not just where alcohol is consumed).  The $50 processing fee for notifications has been eliminated.  Also, employee-only tastings may be held on the retailer’s premises in areas not accessible to the public.

  • Marketing:  Retailers may sell gift cards to consumers.


Manufacturers / Importers and Wholesalers

  • Visits to Retailers:  The regulations have been revised to allow manufacturers and importers to visit retailers—on and off-premises consumption—for the purpose of promoting products or attending to displays.

  • Non-Resident Sellers:  For the first time, there are regulations that explicitly govern non-resident importers and application requirements.

  • Wholesaler Deliveries:  Employees of wholesalers may now deliver up to 20 cases of alcohol in vehicles that are not owned or leased by the wholesaler, and the wholesaler name need not be affixed to the vehicle.  But, the employee must possess documentation with the seller and purchaser identity and type and size of delivery.  Also, the regulations have removed the restriction that a wholesaler may deliver to another wholesaler only if in the same county.

  • Retail Orders; Wholesaler Employee Permits:  Wholesalers are expressly prohibited from delivering and invoicing part of an order made by one retailer to another retailer.  Wholesaler employee permits are not explicitly valid for 5 years.

  • Tied-House Provisions:  The regulations prohibiting tied-houses now include references to third-party marketing entities, which are not allowed as intermediaries between industry members (manufacturers, importers, and wholesalers) and retailers.  The regulations now explicitly prohibit arrangements that result in exclusion of brands.  The monetary value of items that may be provided to retailers by industry members is now aligned with TTB amounts.  Industry members may supply outside signs to retailers, and the allowable point-of-sale advertising materials have been updated.  Industry members may provide retailers with routine business entertainment (meals, events, parties), subject to restrictions.

  • Donations:  Industry members are authorized to withdraw from inventory donations to special occasion permittees; manufacturers must do so through wholesalers.


Wineries

  • Record-Keeping:  Records regarding the source of all agricultural products used in wine production must be kept for three years.  All Tennessee-licensed wineries must file, with the TABC, their contracts with Tennessee grape growers regarding their intention to purchase grapes.

  • Sale on Premises:  The 15,000 gallon / 20% rule for annual on-premises sales has been deleted in favor of the amounts allowed by state statute.

  • Samples; Selling Non-Wine Products:  The regulations now provide that wineries may provide samples to winery visitors in certain limited areas of the winery.  Also, wineries may now sell gift-related items with wine themes or related to wine drinking.


Beer Permittees / Responsible Vendor Program

For the first time, there are regulations that explicitly govern off-premises beer permittees that have enrolled in the Responsible Vendor Program.  Many of the regulations simply articulate the TABC’s past practices.

Non-Profits (Special Events)

Regulations have been made explicitly governing special occasion permits, one-day permits allowing alcohol service in a specifically designated area by “qualified entities” (non-profits).  A formal application process is set forth, and proceeds from the special event must be deposited with the special occasion

Changes to TABC Regulations

The TABC revised regulations governing all liquor licensees.  Our Alcoholic Beverage Group is pleased to highlight the major changes for you.  Grouped by the license held, the summaries should not replace consultation or full review.  Contact Will Cheek or Chris Raybeck with questions.

General Applicability—All Types of Licensees



  • Responsible Vendor Mitigation Program:  The TABC has established an informal program for licensees, similar to that of the responsible vendor for beer retailers.  Licensees following the program may have fines alleviated (by up to half) for any citations.  The program requires a written policy that all employees complete a course in alcohol awareness (including training on applicable laws and regulations) and annual refresher courses.
  • Prior Approval of Advertisements:  In most cases, prior TABC approval of advertising copy is no longer necessary.
Liquor-by-the-Drink (“LBD”) and Catering
  • Advertising.  The ABC eliminated the rules prohibiting advertising happy hour and drink prices.  Licensees may now advertise both, provided the happy hour on liquor ends at 10:00 p.m. and the drink price covers the cost of the ingredients.  Outside signs and billboards may advertise the name of a licensed establishment and the name of a particular brand of alcohol, as long as the LBD licensee pays for the advertising.  Also, availability of alcoholic beverages can be advertised on radio and TV, subject to the same restrictions imposed on other types of licensees.
  • Marketing.  While licensees are still prohibited from giving away alcohol, the term “give” has been refined by replacing the word “drink” with “alcoholic beverage or wine.”  Also, LBD licensees have been removed from the regulation restricting advertising novelties and specialties to consumers, broadening the types of items LBD licensees may give to customers.
  • Managers:  The TABC has specified that new managers and assistant managers have seven days to submit questionnaires to the TABC or face a citation.  Also, all managers and assistant managers should expect to need their own server permits, if they supervise those who serve alcohol.
  • Seating:  The TABC has specified that seats at bars will be counted toward the minimum 75-seat restaurant requirement if the bar is big enough and if meals are regularly served there.  Patio seating that is not heated and cooled year-round will not count toward the minimum seating requirement but will count toward the seat count for license fees.
  • Server Permits:  Temporary server permits will no longer be issued.  Also, LBD licensees must have available for review documentation of the date of hire (dated employment application, dated W-4, etc.) of all servers and managers on premises.  Without it, it will be assumed the employee has been working for more than 61 days.
  • Changing Locations:  For LBD licensees who want to change locations, an abbreviated application process is now available.
  • Catering.  For the first time, there are regulations explicitly governing catering licensees.
Retail Licensees (Off-Premises Consumption)
  • Direct Mail:  Retailers now only need a written request authorizing direct mail, eliminating the requirement of signing the request on–premises.  The rules require removal of recipients within 30 days of the second request to remove.
  • Donations to 501(c)(3) Organizations:  Retailers are authorized to make withdrawals from inventory for donations to non-profits with 501(c)(3) exempt status.
  • Tastings / Consumer Education:  Written notification to the TABC is required for tastings where the retailer hosts, sponsors, or provides an employee to work at the tasting (not just where alcohol is consumed).  The $50 processing fee for notifications has been eliminated.  Also, employee-only tastings may be held on the retailer’s premises in areas not accessible to the public.
  • Marketing:  Retailers may sell gift cards to consumers.
Manufacturers / Importers and Wholesalers
  • Visits to Retailers:  The regulations have been revised to allow manufacturers and importers to visit retailers—on and off-premises consumption—for the purpose of promoting products or attending to displays.
  • Non-Resident Sellers:  For the first time, there are regulations that explicitly govern non-resident importers and application requirements.
  • Wholesaler Deliveries:  Employees of wholesalers may now deliver up to 20 cases of alcohol in vehicles that are not owned or leased by the wholesaler, and the wholesaler name need not be affixed to the vehicle.  But, the employee must possess documentation with the seller and purchaser identity and type and size of delivery.  Also, the regulations have removed the restriction that a wholesaler may deliver to another wholesaler only if in the same county.
  • Retail Orders; Wholesaler Employee Permits:  Wholesalers are expressly prohibited from delivering and invoicing part of an order made by one retailer to another retailer.  Wholesaler employee permits are not explicitly valid for 5 years.
  • Tied-House Provisions:  The regulations prohibiting tied-houses now include references to third-party marketing entities, which are not allowed as intermediaries between industry members (manufacturers, importers, and wholesalers) and retailers.  The regulations now explicitly prohibit arrangements that result in exclusion of brands.  The monetary value of items that may be provided to retailers by industry members is now aligned with TTB amounts.  Industry members may supply outside signs to retailers, and the allowable point-of-sale advertising materials have been updated.  Industry members may provide retailers with routine business entertainment (meals, events, parties), subject to restrictions.
  • Donations:  Industry members are authorized to withdraw from inventory donations to special occasion permittees; manufacturers must do so through wholesalers.
Wineries
  • Record-Keeping:  Records regarding the source of all agricultural products used in wine production must be kept for three years.  All Tennessee-licensed wineries must file, with the TABC, their contracts with Tennessee grape growers regarding their intention to purchase grapes.
  • Sale on Premises:  The 15,000 gallon / 20% rule for annual on-premises sales has been deleted in favor of the amounts allowed by state statute.
  • Samples; Selling Non-Wine Products:  The regulations now provide that wineries may provide samples to winery visitors in certain limited areas of the winery.  Also, wineries may now sell gift-related items with wine themes or related to wine drinking.
Beer Permittees / Responsible Vendor Program
For the first time, there are regulations that explicitly govern off-premises beer permittees that have enrolled in the Responsible Vendor Program.  Many of the regulations simply articulate the TABC’s past practices.

Non-Profits (Special Events)
Regulations have been made explicitly governing special occasion permits, one-day permits allowing alcohol service in a specifically designated area by “qualified entities” (non-profits).  A formal application process is set forth, and proceeds from the special event must be deposited with the special occasion