In The News

Is it OK to Google a Client? Of Course It Is. I'm Probably Googling You Right Now.

The American Bar Association Journal recently posted an article called "Is it OK to Google a client?" The story compares the act to a physician searching for information about patients online, which the story suggests is a violation of the patient's privacy expectations.

Frankly, I was a little surprised at this article, because: (1) it's the 21st century; and (2) when I get a call from a new client or a lawyer referring me work, the first thing I do is google them. Sometimes, I run the searches while I am talking to them on the phone.

Why? Because, as a lawyer, you are an extension of the client. A quick google search reveals their business page, news stories about them, and a general sense of "who they are." By hiring you, a client asks you to advocate for their position. Wouldn't it be relevant to see who it is that you're going to stake some part of your professional reputation on?

Let's be honest, the number # 1 test for a prospective client is "Is this a Crazy Person?" (Closely followed by: "Can this client pay my fees?")

Once you represent them, it'd be malpractice not to have googled the client. What if the client was making statements online (or posting videos or photos) that have a direct bearing on their case? If you don't find it, you can be sure that opposing counsel will.

Speaking of which, don't think for a second that I don't google opposing counsel and/or opposing parties. In fact, one of the best items a creditor can obtain on a credit application is an e-mail address, which I've called the 21st century fingerprint. Google, Facebook, Linkedin, and Twitter are all fair game.

What a strange article for the American Bar Association. I'm going to google the author now.

 

 

June 2011 Newsletter Features New Attorney, Stephanie Taylor, Human Relations Award Dinner, Wildhorse Saloon, & Jackalope Brewing Company.

Bone McAllester Norton is thrilled to welcome Stephanie Taylor and congratulate Charles W. Bone on being honored for making a difference at the 40th Annual CommunityNashville Human Relations Award Dinner.  To read the rest of our newsletter, click here.

Bonelaw Client Stays with Trends

Growlers, half gallon jugs used to transport beer, are one of the hottest growth areas in the beer business, most recently expanding to upscale beer stores in the Nashville area.



Nashville's newest brewery, and Will Cheek client, Jackalope, joins a growing trend of breweries selling only kegs and growlers of beer.  This allows the brewery to open without purchasing expensive bottling equipment.  Some say it also enhances the mystique of the craft brewer.

Bonelaw Client Stays with Trends

Growlers, half gallon jugs used to transport beer, are one of the hottest growth areas in the beer business, most recently expanding to upscale beer stores in the Nashville area.
Nashville's newest brewery, and Will Cheek client, Jackalope, joins a growing trend of breweries selling only kegs and growlers of beer.  This allows the brewery to open without purchasing expensive bottling equipment.  Some say it also enhances the mystique of the craft brewer.

Popcorn Sutton’s Moonshine Legacy

This week, Will Cheek’s client J&M Concepts, LLC placed the first Tennessee White Whiskey, aka moonshine, in Nashville bars.  Partners Jamey Grosser, a former professional Supercross motorcycle racer, and Hank Williams Jr. are partners in J&M Concepts, LLC along with Marvin “Popcorn” Sutton’s wife.  After Popcorn committed suicide at age 62 rather than go to jail for selling untaxed liquor Jamie was determined to pass along Popcorn’s legacy and his moonshine methodology.


“You’ve still got to be careful, though,” Hank Williams Jr. said. “It tastes exactly the same as what Popcorn made, and it’s so smooth you sometimes don’t realize what you’re drinking. Like I’ve heard Jamey (Johnson) say, there’s at least one famous Tennessee whiskey, and now there are going to be two. This one will be in a Mason jar.”


Click here to read more about Popcorn Sutton in the November 12, 2010 Tennessean front page article, “Hank Williams Jr. helps continue Popcorn Sutton’s moonshine legacy.”


 

Popcorn Sutton’s Moonshine Legacy

This week, Will Cheek’s client J&M Concepts, LLC placed the first Tennessee White Whiskey, aka moonshine, in Nashville bars.  Partners Jamey Grosser, a former professional Supercross motorcycle racer, and Hank Williams Jr. are partners in J&M Concepts, LLC along with Marvin “Popcorn” Sutton’s wife.  After Popcorn committed suicide at age 62 rather than go to jail for selling untaxed liquor Jamie was determined to pass along Popcorn’s legacy and his moonshine methodology.

“You’ve still got to be careful, though,” Hank Williams Jr. said. “It tastes exactly the same as what Popcorn made, and it’s so smooth you sometimes don’t realize what you’re drinking. Like I’ve heard Jamey (Johnson) say, there’s at least one famous Tennessee whiskey, and now there are going to be two. This one will be in a Mason jar.”

Click here to read more about Popcorn Sutton in the November 12, 2010 Tennessean front page article, “Hank Williams Jr. helps continue Popcorn Sutton’s moonshine legacy.”