In The News

Health Care Reform Seminar: Preparing Businesses for Immediate Impact

When: Thursday, June 17, 2010 | 7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Where: Bone McAllester Norton

131 Saundersville Road | Parkside Plaza One

Hendersonville, TN  37075



When: Thursday, June 24, 2010 | 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Where: Bone McAllester Norton

Nashville City Center, 16th Floor | 511 Union Street

Nashville, TN  37219



Signed into law March 23, 2010, The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("Health Reform Act") includes sweeping changes which will impact every American.  This briefing will break through the complexities of the legislation and focus on the key provisions that go into effect this year and early in 2011.


If you have employees or work with health care benefits or health plans, join us for this informal session on:



  • Insights into the new rules for health plans and health insurance.

  • Opportunities and challenges for plan design and administration in this new environment.

  • Which parts of the legislation take effect the earliest so you can prioritize.

  • What you need to be doing NOW to prepare for the coming Health Reform Act changes.


Presented by Bone McAllester Norton and Heritage Financial Group, specific topics will include how to prepare for benefit limits, pre-existing condition exclusions and rescission, requirements regarding medical loss ratios, new tax measures, "Cadillac Plan" taxes, coverage of dependent children, early retiree reinsurance, and rules for health accounts (HSAs and FSAs).





To register for this complimentary seminar and breakfast/lunch, RSVP by Friday, June 11 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 615-742-6889 with date/location preference.

Space is limited.



Health Risks of Flood Waters: EPA Guidelines

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cautions the public and emergency responders about the potential hazards associated with flood waters. During heavy rains, sanitary sewers may overflow into floodwaters. Avoid contact with floodwater due to potential contamination with raw sewage and other hazardous substances. Avoid swimming and boating in floodwaters and do not allow children or pets to wade or play in floodwaters.


EPA offers the following guidelines for those in contact with flood water:


- Wash your hands before drinking and eating;


- Wash frequently using soap -- especially disinfecting soap;


- Do not smoke;


- Limit direct contact with contaminated flood water;


- Pay attention to any cuts or open wounds and limit exposure to flood water;


- Pay attention to any unusual symptoms and report them to health care professionals;


- Keep vaccinations current.


The public and emergency response personnel should follow guidelines from federal, state and local health and safety professionals. Early symptoms from exposure to contaminated flood water may include upset stomach, intestinal problems, headache and other flu-like discomfort. Anyone experiencing these and any other problems should immediately seek medical attention.


Children are at greater risk than adults from contaminants carried by flood water. Since they dehydrate faster, they need to drink plenty of fluids. If the safety of your water is in question, either use bottled water or bring tap water to a rolling boil for at least one minute...and let it cool before use.


EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation have compiled other useful information on the web to assist individuals and municipalities address post-flooding clean up concerns. Issues include mold, septic systems, municipal water treatment plants, drinking water and food.

Health Risks of Flood Waters: EPA Guidelines

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cautions the public and emergency responders about the potential hazards associated with flood waters. During heavy rains, sanitary sewers may overflow into floodwaters. Avoid contact with floodwater due to potential contamination with raw sewage and other hazardous substances. Avoid swimming and boating in floodwaters and do not allow children or pets to wade or play in floodwaters.

EPA offers the following guidelines for those in contact with flood water:

- Wash your hands before drinking and eating;

- Wash frequently using soap -- especially disinfecting soap;

- Do not smoke;

- Limit direct contact with contaminated flood water;

- Pay attention to any cuts or open wounds and limit exposure to flood water;

- Pay attention to any unusual symptoms and report them to health care professionals;

- Keep vaccinations current.

The public and emergency response personnel should follow guidelines from federal, state and local health and safety professionals. Early symptoms from exposure to contaminated flood water may include upset stomach, intestinal problems, headache and other flu-like discomfort. Anyone experiencing these and any other problems should immediately seek medical attention.

Children are at greater risk than adults from contaminants carried by flood water. Since they dehydrate faster, they need to drink plenty of fluids. If the safety of your water is in question, either use bottled water or bring tap water to a rolling boil for at least one minute...and let it cool before use.

EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation have compiled other useful information on the web to assist individuals and municipalities address post-flooding clean up concerns. Issues include mold, septic systems, municipal water treatment plants, drinking water and food.