In The News

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.

  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.

Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.

James Crumlin Elected Fellow of the Tennessee Bar Foundation

James Crumlin was elected a Fellow of the Tennessee Bar Foundation, an association of 710 attorneys across the state.

Invitations to membership, a position of great honor, were extended to 35 attorneys this year by the Board of Trustees.The introduction of new Fellows took place at the annual Fellows' Dinner in Nashville.

The Bar Foundation's purpose is two-fold: to honor attorneys who have distinguished themselves in the profession and to administer a grant making program. That project, known by its acronym "IOLTA" (Interest On Lawyers' Trust Accounts), has awarded grants in excess of $16,000,000 to law-related, public interest projects throughout Tennessee.

James focuses his practice in the areas of labor and employment law, corporate business litigation, entertainment disputes and small business representation. He has been recognized for his contributions to the Nashville legal community on several occasions, including as a "Best of the Bar" honoree in 2009. In 2007, James was chosen as the recipient of the Nashville Emerging Leaders Award for Law. This distinguished honor recognizes professionals under the age of 40 who have excelled in their profession while making a difference in the Nashville community. James was also a member of Tennessee Bar Association's Leadership Law Class of 2006, and has served on the steering committee since then.

He is a member of the 2009-2010 class of Leadership Nashville and a graduate of the 41st Young Leaders Council class. He is President of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee board of directors, and Chair of the Matthew Walker Comprehensive Health Center, Inc., board of directors. He also serves on the boards of Young Leaders Council, Kelly Miller Smith Center Against Abusive Behavior and The Tennessee Repertory Theater, Vanderbilt University Law School National Alumni Board and Meharry Medical College National Alumni Association.

James Crumlin Elected Fellow of the Tennessee Bar Foundation

James Crumlin was elected a Fellow of the Tennessee Bar Foundation, an association of 710 attorneys across the state.

Invitations to membership, a position of great honor, were extended to 35 attorneys this year by the Board of Trustees.The introduction of new Fellows took place at the annual Fellows' Dinner in Nashville.

The Bar Foundation's purpose is two-fold: to honor attorneys who have distinguished themselves in the profession and to administer a grant making program. That project, known by its acronym "IOLTA" (Interest On Lawyers' Trust Accounts), has awarded grants in excess of $16,000,000 to law-related, public interest projects throughout Tennessee.

James focuses his practice in the areas of labor and employment law, corporate business litigation, entertainment disputes and small business representation. He has been recognized for his contributions to the Nashville legal community on several occasions, including as a "Best of the Bar" honoree in 2009. In 2007, James was chosen as the recipient of the Nashville Emerging Leaders Award for Law. This distinguished honor recognizes professionals under the age of 40 who have excelled in their profession while making a difference in the Nashville community. James was also a member of Tennessee Bar Association's Leadership Law Class of 2006, and has served on the steering committee since then.

He is a member of the 2009-2010 class of Leadership Nashville and a graduate of the 41st Young Leaders Council class. He is President of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee board of directors, and Chair of the Matthew Walker Comprehensive Health Center, Inc., board of directors. He also serves on the boards of Young Leaders Council, Kelly Miller Smith Center Against Abusive Behavior and The Tennessee Repertory Theater, Vanderbilt University Law School National Alumni Board and Meharry Medical College National Alumni Association.

James Crumlin Named Young Leader of the Year

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates attorney James Crumlin on receiving the Young Leader of the Year Award from the Young Leaders Council.


 This award is given in recognition of the achievements and contributions of an outstanding Alumni of Young Leaders Council.


Congratulations to James on this well-deserved recognition.

James Crumlin Named Young Leader of the Year

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates attorney James Crumlin on receiving the Young Leader of the Year Award from the Young Leaders Council.

 This award is given in recognition of the achievements and contributions of an outstanding Alumni of Young Leaders Council.

Congratulations to James on this well-deserved recognition.

Volunteerism instills passion in daily life

By James A. Crumlin Jr.
The volunteering in America report recently released by the Corporation for National and Community Service, which showed an increase in the number of Nashville volunteers, also reported important data on the volunteer life cycle, defined as the arc of civic involvement that tends to increase as citizens feel a deeper connection to their communities.




As board chairman of the Young Leaders Council, I am particularly intrigued by the research showing that the national volunteer rate tends to increase with age until mid-life. I have seen this trend firsthand in the young professionals establishing themselves in their careers who have expressed a desire to take their volunteerism to the next level by applying to the Young Leaders Council board training program.

Founded in 1985, YLC was developed to address the need to broaden and strengthen Nashville’s volunteer leadership base by training men and women ages 25-40 to effectively serve on the board of directors of nonprofit organizations in Middle Tennessee. To date, more than 1,800 graduates have served on the boards of 150 local nonprofit agencies.

I have found what Laurel Creech, chief service officer for the Mayor’s office and a graduate of YLC Class 38, said to be true: “There is growing national and local interest in weaving service into our daily lives and selecting passions that are important to us that we can dig into and make a difference. With the growing needs of low-capacity nonprofits and the budgetary constraints of local government, the opportunities to engage are vast.”

Since first participating in the program in 2003 as a member of Class 41, I have been inspired to serve on more than 15 boards, including serving as immediate past president of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee and as the current board chair of Matthew Walker Comprehensive Health Center Inc.

In addition to my involvement in the community, my board training has given me the tools needed to benefit my professional career. I have had the honor of participating in a number of leadership roles within my industry, the most exciting of which was when former Gov. Phil Bredesen appointed me to serve as a commissioner on the Tennessee Civil Service Commission through 2014.

Even in these challenging economic times, corporations realize the value of nonprofit leadership training because young leaders bring back to the workplace those skills they have learned through their volunteer experiences. Serving on the boards of area nonprofits introduces young leaders to a network of valuable contacts, in addition to providing an invaluable service to the community.

Today, more than ever, nonprofits benefit from the skills and passion that young leaders provide. I applaud all volunteers for their giving spirit during times of great need, and especially their continued desire to volunteer after things have improved.

James A. Crumlin Jr. is a member of Bone McAllester Norton PLLC law firm and was named the 2010 Young Leader of the Year by the Young Leaders Council.

Can that post get me fired? The Do’s and Don’ts of Social Media and Employment Law

Join us for our interactive panel to learn about common concerns with Employment Law, Human Resources and  Social Media.


Friday, September 16th 8 am-9:30 am

Complimentary breakfast at 8 am

Panel begins promptly at 8:30 am



Nashville City Center

511 Union Street, Suite 1600

Our speakers include Employment Law attorneys James Crumlin and Keith Dennen of Bone McAllester Norton, along with Lynn Hutson, the Director of Human Resource Services at XMi. We look forward to educating you on the impact of  social media on all aspects of employment law and will leave you with some ideas to protect you and your employees.

James Crumlin speaks on Social Media and Background Checks.

Social Media Background Checks: A Slippery Slope


By John Borrowman, CPC
Borrowman Baker, LLC, BV Staffing + Consulting
Houston, TX


Interviewee: James Crumlin
Bone, McAllester, Norton
Nashville, TN

Understandably, employers want to get as much information as they can about a candidate. And the Internet makes it easy to use sites like Facebook to do a "social media background check." Taking that approach can be more complicated than it sounds, however.

For a more nuanced view, we turned to James Crumlin, a Partner in the Nashville law firm of Bone, McAllester, Norton. James specializes in the area of employment law.

Borrowman: It almost seems like a no-brainer for an employer to do a social media background check on its candidates. What could be wrong with that?


Crumlin: Well, there's nothing wrong if that process follows the same rules as any other background check. It's in the nature of a social media background check, though, that it can invite employers to look at information that may not be relevant to job performance. For example, your candidate may have posted vacation pictures that may not be very tasteful. But, are those pictures really relevant to whether the person can do the job he's being considered for? Or, is it simply unflattering information?

Borrowman: Is the process of drawing that line any different than drawing the line when it comes to non-work related information gathered in a standard background check?

Crumlin: Not really. You just need to make sure you're not using the social media background check to do something you couldn't do otherwise. In a social media background check, for example, you might find reference to a person's religion, race, marital status, disability or other information that is protected under Federal employment laws. When you're interviewing a candidate, you're not supposed to inquire about any of that information.

As with any other background check, the candidate must consent to the social media background check and be notified of any adverse information that is found. There are companies that do this kind of background check. The FTC has determined that they are compliant with the Fair Credit Reporting Act, which governs other forms of background checking.

Borrowman: Fundamentally then, things that you can't ask in an interview, you can't do research on in a social media background check.

Crumlin: Right.

Borrowman: So, why would you go looking at social media sites? Is there likely to be anything there that is truly relevant? Crumlin: It depends. You might not want a candidate who has a history of talking about former employers and bosses in a defamatory way on a social media site. People do weird things with social media. They think they can say anything. If the candidate is bragging about having a few drinks at lunch and then going back to work, that would be information that might be relevant to the hiring decision.

Borrowman: And that's where a social media background check becomes a slippery slope? Crumlin: That's right. It complicates things because you have to wonder whether or not the information that you find is relevant to job performance. If the information is not relevant to job performance and if you use that information, do you violate Federal laws?

I would always recommend that the employer stick to the essentials of the job; that they stick to the job requirements. If the employer learns something that appears contrary to information provided during an interview, there can still be a question about whether the information is job-related.

Borrowman: Can you give an example?

Crumlin: You could be in a situation where the job requires the candidate to do a lot of travel. The candidate says travel is fine. In the interview, you can't ask questions about family. In the social media background check, though, you discover photos of a wife and young kids. If the decision not to hire is based on that information, the employer could be in trouble.

Borrowman: How would an employer handle that new information? You shouldn't ignore it. But, you can't ask about it.

Crumlin: No, you can't use the social media background check to learn information that you can't learn in interviewing or other background checks. You have to look to his qualifications, to see whether he traveled in a previous position. You could ask references whether the candidate ever had problems with the travel requirements of the job. That's about as close as you can get.

Borrowman: Do you have any "bottom-line" recommendations about doing a social media background check?

Crumlin: One thing employers should not do is take a casual approach to using social media background check as a quasi-background check. They should not (and should not allow their employees to) think "I'll just go on Facebook and see what I can find out."

If you're going to use this process, you need to have it as a formal part of the hiring process. You need to treat it just like you would any other background check that the company does. You should notify the candidate that you are doing the background check, have them consent to it, and also inform them of any adverse information you find. If it leads to a decision not to hire, you have to explain that, too. All the while, you have to make sure you're in compliance with Federal employment laws in conducting these background checks.

August 2011 Newsletter Features Can That Post Get Me Fired? The Do's and Don'ts of Social Media and Employment Law

Join us for our interactive panel to learn about common concerns with Employment Law, Human Resources and  Social Media. To read the rest of our newsletter, click here.

James Crumlin to Present at the Nashville Business Journal’s “HR Summit for a Changing Workplace”

Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Crumlin, along with five other panelists, will present challenges and demands for everyone, from the board and CEO to the entry-level employees at the Nashville Business Journal’s “HR Summit for a Changing Workplace.”


The breakfast and panel discussion will take place beginning at 7:30am on Tuesday, May 17 at the Hutton Hotel.


Click here for more details and to register.


 

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.


  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.


Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.


Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.








 

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.

  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.

Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.

 

April 2011 Newsletter Features Human Rights Leaders, ATHENA, Top 40, Margaritaville, Real Estate, & Medical Records

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys continue to gain recognition in the Nashville community.  The firm also sponsored "Day on the Hill" Luncheon for the Tennessee Bankers Association Young Lawyers Division, and made sure to keep the theme fun.  To read the rest of our newsletter, click here.

James A. Crumlin, Jr. to Present at TBA’s Introduction to Trial Practice

Bone McAllester Norton attorney James A. Crumlin, Jr. is one of twelve speakers presenting at the Tennessee Bar Association’s Introduction to Trial Practice program on March 31, 2011.


 This CLE is designed to recreate a “real” trial experience with seasoned lawyers. Attendees will observe key aspects of a basic trial including voir dire, direct and cross examination of an expert, and other areas often left out of law school curriculum.


Click here for more details and to register for this program.


 

James Crumlin Interviewed in Article “Checking Candidates’ Credit: Good Idea?”

Borrowman Baker, LLC, BV Staffing + Consulting recently featured Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Crumlin in an article addressing the usefulness of credit checks when hiring new staff.


“Is the information you will receive through the credit check essential to the job you're trying to fill? If it's not absolutely clear that it is, you're better off using other forms of background checks” states James.


Click here to read “Checking Candidates’ Credit: Good Idea?”


 

James Crumlin Named Young Leader of the Year

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates attorney James Crumlin on receiving the Young Leader of the Year Award from the Young Leaders Council. This award is given in recognition of the achievements and contributions of an outstanding Alumni of Young Leaders Council.


Congratulations to James on this well-deserved recognition.


James Crumlin Named Young Leader of the Year

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates attorney James Crumlin on receiving the Young Leader of the Year Award from the Young Leaders Council. This award is given in recognition of the achievements and contributions of an outstanding Alumni of Young Leaders Council.

Congratulations to James on this well-deserved recognition.