In The News

Will Cheek Talks about Blogging with Nashville Business Journal

“I try to have fun with it,” Bone McAllester Norton Will Cheek told the Nashville Business Journal in a January 11 article. The article notes that blogging is worth the effort if you are willing to put in the time.

Read more from Will and this topic here.

 

Will Cheek Talks about Blogging with Nashville Business Journal

“I try to have fun with it,” Bone McAllester Norton Will Cheek told the Nashville Business Journal in a January 11 article. The article notes that blogging is worth the effort if you are willing to put in the time.

Read more from Will and this topic here.

 

The Rest of the Story: 2010 Liquor Laws that Failed to Pass

Often, some of the most interesting legislative news relates to bills that failed to pass.  The 2010 session was no exception.

Perhaps the most notable was a bill by Representative Todd and Senator Fowlkes to shut down liquor and beer service at midnight across the state.  With the fiscal note for eliminating sales from midnight until 3:00 a.m. rather daunting, the legislation failed to advance.

As was widely suspected, the “wine at retail food store license” was dead on arrival this year.  We expect that wine in grocery stores will be a hot topic of discussion after the election and encourage readers to check with our blog Last Call.

In an effort to address the widespread failure of bars, music venues and other places to meet the minimum food service requirements, Representative Todd proposed that all licensees submit an oath of percentage of food sales in connection with license renewals.  Representative Todd later became a primary backer of the limited service restaurant license bill, which more-effectively addresses the food service issue.

Efforts to make the sale of alcohol to minors a crime punishable by a mandatory period of imprisonment of forty-eight hours failed to gain momentum.

The Rest of the Story: 2010 Liquor Laws that Failed to Pass

Often, some of the most interesting legislative news relates to bills that failed to pass.  The 2010 session was no exception.

Perhaps the most notable was a bill by Representative Todd and Senator Fowlkes to shut down liquor and beer service at midnight across the state.  With the fiscal note for eliminating sales from midnight until 3:00 a.m. rather daunting, the legislation failed to advance.

As was widely suspected, the “wine at retail food store license” was dead on arrival this year.  We expect that wine in grocery stores will be a hot topic of discussion after the election and encourage readers to check with our blog Last Call.

In an effort to address the widespread failure of bars, music venues and other places to meet the minimum food service requirements, Representative Todd proposed that all licensees submit an oath of percentage of food sales in connection with license renewals.  Representative Todd later became a primary backer of the limited service restaurant license bill, which more-effectively addresses the food service issue.

Efforts to make the sale of alcohol to minors a crime punishable by a mandatory period of imprisonment of forty-eight hours failed to gain momentum.

ABC to Live for One More Year

The legislature extended the duration of the ABC as an independent state agency until June 30, 2011.  During the legislative session, there was informal discussion of merging the ABC with other agencies, including the Department of Revenue.  Backers of merging state agencies claim that the state will save significantly on redundant services, such as computer support, clerical staff, rent and storage.

We expect that the future of the ABC will continue to be discussed during the upcoming year.  Follow the progress at our blog Last Call for updates.

ABC to Live for One More Year

The legislature extended the duration of the ABC as an independent state agency until June 30, 2011.  During the legislative session, there was informal discussion of merging the ABC with other agencies, including the Department of Revenue.  Backers of merging state agencies claim that the state will save significantly on redundant services, such as computer support, clerical staff, rent and storage.

We expect that the future of the ABC will continue to be discussed during the upcoming year.  Follow the progress at our blog Last Call for updates.