In The News

James Mackler listed on 2012's Forty under 40 list

Congratulations are in order for the Nashville Business Journal's Forty Under 40 class of 2012. We are so proud of our own James Mackler for making this year's list! The following 40 winners, first named during a reveal party Tuesday night at Nashville City Club were deemed to be making a difference in their companies and community by a panel of judges. All of the winners will be profiled in a special section of the March 9 edition of the Nashville Business Journal, with individual profiles following throughout the year. See the entire list here.  

James Mackler listed on 2012's Forty under 40 list

Congratulations are in order for the Nashville Business Journal's Forty Under 40 class of 2012. We are so proud of our own James Mackler for making this year's list! The following 40 winners, first named during a reveal party Tuesday night at Nashville City Club were deemed to be making a difference in their companies and community by a panel of judges. All of the winners will be profiled in a special section of the March 9 edition of the Nashville Business Journal, with individual profiles following throughout the year. See the entire list here.  

Chris Raybeck featured in UT Law Best of the Best

The Volunteer spirit is strong in Chris Raybeck (LAW '03), in more ways than one.



 

Chris Raybeck featured in UT Law Best of the Best

The Volunteer spirit is strong in Chris Raybeck (LAW '03), in more ways than one.

 

9% Vets must fight for fair compensation

By James Mackler


There is growing anger in this country as the “99 percent” continue to point out the widening gap between rich and poor. The “occupy” movement has spread from Wall Street to Nashville and beyond.


Lost among the discussion of high unemployment rates, bank bailouts and excessive corporate greed is the fact that there is a group much smaller than the 99 percent that bears the combined burden of economic inequality and “service inequality.” This “service inequality” is reflected in the fact that, at any given time, less than one-half of 1 percent of the adult population are serving in the active-duty military. Nine percent of the total adult population are military veterans. These are the “9 percent.”


The “9 percent” share the same economic challenges as the “99 percent,” but their burden is increased by the toll exacted from military service. The 9 percent make up 13 percent of the adults in homeless shelters. The 9 percent face an unemployment rate of 12.4 percent. The 9 percent account for 20 percent of all suicides in the U.S.


Although veterans are facing unemployment, homelessness and suicide in disproportionate numbers, a recent poll by the Pew Research Center indicates 70 percent of the general public admit that they have little or no understanding of the problems faced by those in the military. Even veterans themselves do not seem to recognize the negative impact of service on their civilian life. Rather, the vast majority of those who have served say that their military experience has helped them to get ahead in life. Eight in 10 would advise a young person close to them to join the military.


How can it be that the 9 percent have so little self-awareness at the same time that the 99 percent are becoming increasingly aware of their own economic disparity? The answer probably is deeply rooted in military culture. Warriors are trained to endure, even to embrace hardship. Self-sufficiency is a coveted trait. Asking for help can be a sign of weakness. The soldier’s mantra during hard times is to simply “suck it up.”


These are admirable traits in battle. They are counterproductive at home when jobs are scarce and Congress eyes veterans benefits as entitlements that can be cut in the name of balancing the budget. The time has come for veterans to refocus the energy that brought them home from the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan. Veterans need to recognize that neither the 99 percent nor the 1 percent are going to advocate for them. It is time for veterans to mobilize on our own behalf.


We need to show employers that we have skills and experience that are unmatched in the civilian world. We need to show politicians that health care and retirement and a social safety net are fair compensation for our sacrifice — not entitlements. And if it comes down to it, after multiple deployments to some of the most inhospitable places on Earth, occupying Wall Street or Pennsylvania Avenue will be easy.


 

We Welcome Rick Nickels!

Rick's practice areas include corporate law, employment law, estate planning and probate. He is a member of the Nashville, Tennessee and American Bar Associations and the Middle Tennessee Estate Planning Council.




Rick graduated cum laude from Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1989. Before attending law school, he worked as a trust administrator for a trust company outside of Chicago, Illinois. In 1995 he graduated from Samford University, Cumberland School of Law in Birmingham, Alabama, where he received academic awards in the areas of Advanced Decedents’ Estates and Trusts and Property II.

Rick grew up in a Chicago suburb where he attended an all boys’ high school run by the Benedictine monks. At Carthage College, Rick played baseball and met his wife, Amy, a Nashville native.

Rick and Amy have three children, Matthew, Molly and Jack. They live near Radnor Lake and are frequent patrons of the “Purple Cow.” Rick has coached youth sports since graduating from college. He is active in church and community organizations, especially those associated with Brentwood Academy and St. Paul Christian Academy, where his children attend school. Rick serves on the Board of Hearing Solutions International, Inc. and West Nashville Sports League (WNSL).

In his free time Rick is a runner and treasures time in his yard with his family and their golden doodles, Libby and Georgia.

We Welcome Rick Nickels!

Rick's practice areas include corporate law, employment law, estate planning and probate. He is a member of the Nashville, Tennessee and American Bar Associations and the Middle Tennessee Estate Planning Council.



Rick graduated cum laude from Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1989. Before attending law school, he worked as a trust administrator for a trust company outside of Chicago, Illinois. In 1995 he graduated from Samford University, Cumberland School of Law in Birmingham, Alabama, where he received academic awards in the areas of Advanced Decedents’ Estates and Trusts and Property II.

Rick grew up in a Chicago suburb where he attended an all boys’ high school run by the Benedictine monks. At Carthage College, Rick played baseball and met his wife, Amy, a Nashville native.

Rick and Amy have three children, Matthew, Molly and Jack. They live near Radnor Lake and are frequent patrons of the “Purple Cow.” Rick has coached youth sports since graduating from college. He is active in church and community organizations, especially those associated with Brentwood Academy and St. Paul Christian Academy, where his children attend school. Rick serves on the Board of Hearing Solutions International, Inc. and West Nashville Sports League (WNSL).

In his free time Rick is a runner and treasures time in his yard with his family and their golden doodles, Libby and Georgia.

Attorney James Mackler Discusses Pentagon's Investigation Into Cutting Military Pension Plans

James Mackler was interviewed by Channel 2 about the possible pension cuts facing the US Military.


NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Almost 10 years ago America, for the first time in modern history, was attacked at home.


Thousands of young men and women decided they couldn't sit at home. They wanted to serve.


Attorney James Mackler was one of them.


"I was in private practice for about seven years in Colorado and after September 11, I decided to join the army and be a part of the fight that was going on," Mackler recalled. "Our country had just been attacked, so I went to my local recruiting station and said, ‘Hey I want to join up.'"




Mackler went to flight school and in 2005 was deployed with the Ft. Campbell 101st Airborne Division as a Black Hawk Pilot. Today he's a Reservist back to practicing law in the private sector.


 

Click here for the entire story and the video
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Stephen Zralek speaks to PPAMS Mid-South

Jailbirds Don't Tweet: The Smart, Sane, and Legal Approach to Social Media


Social media is changing everyday.  Whether you are a pro or novice, there's always something new.  Come to the PPAMS MidSouth PromoShow and learn:




  • How to avoid liability when making online product endorsements and marketing to children

  • The three features of successful content

  • What to include in a social media policy for employees

  • Real world examples

  • Practical ideas to spice up your own social media strategy

  • Issues surrounding privacy

  • Practical steps to shield against claims of defamation and copyright infringement when using social media


SEMINAR: Jailbirds Don't Tweet: The Smart, Sane, and Legal Approach to Social Media


Sponsored by Bulova


Date/Time: Monday, August 8, 2011 · 12:30am - 2:00pm


Location: Broadlands A


Speaker: Steven Zralek (Bone, McAllester, Norton), Amanda O'Brien (The Harmon Group)