In The News

Stacey Garrett honored at this year's Women of Legend and Merit Awards dinner

Congratulations go out to Stacey Garrett on this incredible honor!

 

Women of Legend & Merit


Celebrating the Power of Women


2012 HONOREES

This year the Women of Legend and Merit Award will honor seven women in various categories. They are:

ATHLETICS

Catana Starks, Ed.D., the first African-American woman to coach a men's NCAA Division I golf team and retired university professor;

BUSINESS

Mignon Francois, owner, The Cupcake Collection;

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Mary Carver-Patrick, entrepreneur, retired educator and active volunteer;

EDUCATION

Karen Brown Dunlap, Ph.D., president of The Poynter Institute;

LEADERSHIP

Sharon Gentry, Ed.D., Metropolitan Nashville Public School Board member, District 1 and health care IT manager, HCA;

LEGAL

Stacey A. Garrett, founding member and board chair of Bone McAllester Norton;

MEDIA

Paula Lovell, president, Lovell Communications.

Learn more about the event here

 

Stacey Garrett honored at this year's Women of Legend and Merit Awards dinner

Congratulations go out to Stacey Garrett on this incredible honor!

 

Women of Legend & Merit

Celebrating the Power of Women

2012 HONOREES

This year the Women of Legend and Merit Award will honor seven women in various categories. They are:

ATHLETICS
Catana Starks, Ed.D., the first African-American woman to coach a men's NCAA Division I golf team and retired university professor;

BUSINESS
Mignon Francois, owner, The Cupcake Collection;

COMMUNITY SERVICE
Mary Carver-Patrick, entrepreneur, retired educator and active volunteer;

EDUCATION
Karen Brown Dunlap, Ph.D., president of The Poynter Institute;

LEADERSHIP
Sharon Gentry, Ed.D., Metropolitan Nashville Public School Board member, District 1 and health care IT manager, HCA;

LEGAL
Stacey A. Garrett, founding member and board chair of Bone McAllester Norton;

MEDIA
Paula Lovell, president, Lovell Communications.

Learn more about the event here
 

Stacey Garrett named Chairperson of the Board of TN Human Rights Commission

Tennessee Human Rights Commission Names New Chairperson of the Board


The Tennessee Human Rights Commission (THRC) appointed a new Chairperson of the Board of Commissioners. Ms. Stacey Garrett of Nashville, Tennessee will serve as Chair of the Board for a two year term and will assume her position as Chair at the next Commissioner’s meeting in January 2012.
Garrett is a founding member of Bone McAllester Norton, PLLC and chair of the firm's Board of Directors. Garrett concentrates her practice in the areas of higher education, corporate transactions, immigration, health care and government affairs. Former Governor Bredesen designated Garrett to serve on a Judicial Redistricting Study Committee and the Committee to Study the Administration of the Death Penalty. In 2003, she was named to The Tennessean's "Top 40 Under 40." In 2007, Ms. Garrett was honored to be named as one of the Nashville Business Journal's Women of Influence in the Entrepreneur category. She is also a member of the upcoming 2011-2012 Leadership Nashville class. Ms. Garrett has served as a Commissioner on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission since 2009 and was reappointed to serve on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission through 2015.


The Commission is an independent state agency charged with eradicating discrimination and protecting the civil rights of all individuals within the state in the areas of housing, employment and public accommodations. If you’ve been discriminated against or would like more information about your civil rights please call us at 800.251.3589 or visit the agency’s informational website at www.tn.gov/humanrights.


 

Stacey Garrett named Chairperson of the Board of TN Human Rights Commission

Tennessee Human Rights Commission Names New Chairperson of the Board

The Tennessee Human Rights Commission (THRC) appointed a new Chairperson of the Board of Commissioners. Ms. Stacey Garrett of Nashville, Tennessee will serve as Chair of the Board for a two year term and will assume her position as Chair at the next Commissioner’s meeting in January 2012.
Garrett is a founding member of Bone McAllester Norton, PLLC and chair of the firm's Board of Directors. Garrett concentrates her practice in the areas of higher education, corporate transactions, immigration, health care and government affairs. Former Governor Bredesen designated Garrett to serve on a Judicial Redistricting Study Committee and the Committee to Study the Administration of the Death Penalty. In 2003, she was named to The Tennessean's "Top 40 Under 40." In 2007, Ms. Garrett was honored to be named as one of the Nashville Business Journal's Women of Influence in the Entrepreneur category. She is also a member of the upcoming 2011-2012 Leadership Nashville class. Ms. Garrett has served as a Commissioner on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission since 2009 and was reappointed to serve on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission through 2015.

The Commission is an independent state agency charged with eradicating discrimination and protecting the civil rights of all individuals within the state in the areas of housing, employment and public accommodations. If you’ve been discriminated against or would like more information about your civil rights please call us at 800.251.3589 or visit the agency’s informational website at www.tn.gov/humanrights.

 

Stacey Garrett Re-Appointed by Governor Bredesen to Tennessee Human Rights Commission

Governor Phil Bredesen has appointed Stacey Garrett, a founding member of the firm, to a second term on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

The Commission is Tennessee's independent state agency with responsibilities pertaining to the prevention and elimination of discrimination in employment, public accommodations, and housing.  Stacey was first appointed by Governor Bredesen to the agency's governing board in 2003 and will now continue to serve until 2015.

Stacey said she believes firmly in community and civic responsibility and is grateful for the opportunity to continue her work and service on the commission at an exemplary level.

Stacey is Chair of the Board of Directors of Bone McAllester Norton and focuses her practice in higher education, corporate transactions, immigration, healthcare, and government affairs.  She has served in many government and nonprofit leadership positions throughout her legal career.

She has earned recognition by numerous publications and among her peers in the legal profession.  In 2003, she was named one of the Tennessean's "Top 40 Under 40." She was also selected as Nashville Business Journal's "Best of the Bar" in immigration law for several years, and in 2007 she was named by the Nashville Business Journal as a "Woman of Influence" in the Entrepreneur category.

Stacey Garrett Re-Appointed by Governor Bredesen to Tennessee Human Rights Commission

Governor Phil Bredesen has appointed Stacey Garrett, a founding member of the firm, to a second term on the Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

The Commission is Tennessee's independent state agency with responsibilities pertaining to the prevention and elimination of discrimination in employment, public accommodations, and housing.  Stacey was first appointed by Governor Bredesen to the agency's governing board in 2003 and will now continue to serve until 2015.

Stacey said she believes firmly in community and civic responsibility and is grateful for the opportunity to continue her work and service on the commission at an exemplary level.

Stacey is Chair of the Board of Directors of Bone McAllester Norton and focuses her practice in higher education, corporate transactions, immigration, healthcare, and government affairs.  She has served in many government and nonprofit leadership positions throughout her legal career.

She has earned recognition by numerous publications and among her peers in the legal profession.  In 2003, she was named one of the Tennessean's "Top 40 Under 40." She was also selected as Nashville Business Journal's "Best of the Bar" in immigration law for several years, and in 2007 she was named by the Nashville Business Journal as a "Woman of Influence" in the Entrepreneur category.

Tennessee Human Rights Commission features Stacey Garrett at 2010 Employment Discrimination Law Seminar

As a featured speaker, Stacey Garrett will present at the Tennessee Human Rights Commission’s 2010 Employment Discrimination Law Seminar in Nashville on June 17.

Attorneys Stacey Garrett and James Mackler Participate in Special Olympics Over the Edge Event

Attorneys Stacey Garrett and James Mackler rappelled over the Nashville City Center Building on Friday to raise money for the Special Olympics. They each descended over 400 feet to a crowd of onlookers below.


To learn more about this event, visit the Special Olympics site.

To see pictures of James and Stacey, visit our Facebook page.

10th Annual Fellowship Breakfast Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

On Monday, January 17, 2011, over 450 people joined Bone McAllester Norton at our tenth annual Fellowship Breakfast to celebrate the memory and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


 The celebration was held at the Hutton Hotel in Nashville and featured the Fisk Jubilee Singers as our entertainment.


Bone McAllester Norton's annual Fellowship Breakfast is the firm's most honored tradition.  We founded Bone McAllester Norton in 2002 as a new firm, to put into practice a set of core principles and values to which we are unfailingly committed. We adopted the phrase “Law – Life – Passion” as a shorthand way of expressing those principles. One value about which the firm is passionate is diversity.  We believe that we have created a law firm that reflects the diversity of our clients – people of different idealistic, socioeconomic, educational, ethnic, racial and religious backgrounds - and which reflects the core commitments firm founders Charles W. Bone and Stacey A. Garrett made on the day the firm was created.  Rather than simply closing our offices on the MLK holiday, we decided to honor Dr. King’s memory by inviting a few family members, friends and clients to join us for breakfast.  We spend this time together to reflect upon Dr. King, his legacy, and the contributions he made to our world and to each of us personally.


This year, we were honored to have the two time Grammy-Nominated Fisk Jubilee Singers as our entertainment. In 1871, the original Jubilee Singers introduced "slave songs" to the world. Today, the Fisk Jubilee Singers continue the tradition of singing the Negro spiritual around the world sharing this rich culture while preserving this unique music.


Following the Fisk Jubilee Singers, we opened the floor and encouraged comments by anyone who wished to talk about Dr. King's legacy.  Previous Fellowship Breakfasts have featured prominent civil rights champions Dr. E. Rip Patton, Diane Nash, John Seigenthaler and Mike Cody.


We invite you to view:
About the Fisk Jubilee Singers
Video of the Life and Legacy of Dr. King
Slideshow of our 2011 Fellowship Breakfast


 

Bonelaw Board Chair, Stacey A. Garrett Goes Extreme

By Stacey A. Garrett


When the Special Olympics of Tennessee announced it was bringing its “Over the Edge” fundraiser to the Nashville City Center for anyone brave enough to rappel down the side of the 27-story downtown high rise, Bone McAllester Norton attorney and Board Chair Stacey Garrett said, “Sign me up!”  But, WHY?  Read her story.


Yes, I did!  I rappelled our 27-story building.


It all started after reading an email announcing a fundraiser for the Special Olympics of Tennessee to sponsor a year round sports training and athletic competition for more than 16,000 children and adults with intellectual disabilities.  Those raising at least $1,000 to support the cause would be among the persons selected to rappel from the downtown Nashville City Center, which is 27 stories and over 400 feet.


Truth is, I never gave it a second thought and signed up within 5 minutes of receiving the email.  It seemed like the experience of a lifetime and a great challenge to advocate for a special organization.


So, the answer to my most frequently asked question, “But WHY!?” is -- it was a natural response from a very adventurous spirit.  And, the answer to the next question, “Are you crazy?” -- definitely not.


The fundraising challenge became an incredible source of fun as I worked to develop, promote and manage my own fundraising webpage and spread the word about the campaign.  Learning about the Special Olympics of Tennessee was a wonderful experience.  The best advocate is a believer in his or her cause, and throughout this process, I learned more and more about the truly special cause this organization supports.  It was amazing to see the event participants become vocal and active advocates of the Special Olympics of Tennessee.


With the fundraising goal met, I was assigned to rappel on Friday, September 10 at 3:00 p.m.  An exciting idea was about to become a reality.


The day was met with persistent and heavy rain.  Driving up to the Nashville City Center (where I work) and watching the rappellers even in the hard rain, I wasn’t sure how I felt. Was it fear? Would I actually go through with it?  In reality, I had no idea how I would react when the time came, because the experience was unknown and it was the fear of the unknown that was most distressing.


I was watching the weather radar nonstop and praying suddenly it wouldn’t rain (or at least not so hard) when 3 pm arrived and, amazingly, the sun came out.  My worried parents camped out with family, friends and our entire office to watch.


Stepping off the elevator on the 27th floor, I thought about turning around.  Standing there was one of the Special Olympics participants to cheer and thank us, and I couldn’t walk away.  The volunteers there to help us at the top were from different places.  Some worked in power plants and hung in ropes for a living.  Each and every one of them was an incredible source of support.


I will never forget climbing out onto the ledge on my knees. In that moment, feeling nothing around me, I realized there was no turning back.  Taking a deep breath, I slowly sat back but was unable to move downward due to the weight of the rope. After several seconds in a completely horizontal position and not moving, I quickly jumped back on the ledge.


With the encouragement of the volunteers, I tried once more. I remember being told: “Stacey, girl, you are already over the edge. It is that easy. You did it. Now keep going.”


Things went okay for the first six stories, but then my foot slipped off a wet window and I began swinging and couldn’t get traction for my foot. I admit I panicked a bit. But, I vividly recall that in the next second, I heard the Bone McAllester Norton team cheering me on loud and clear and, in that instant, realized my surroundings. Those cheers were enough to allow me to thoughtfully find a place to put my feet for traction and to keep going down.  Watching the video, it is clear to me when all this occurred. It is a very brief time on tape, but at the moment, it seemed an eternity.


Although the trek down seemed an eternity, when my feet touched the ground at the end, a smile was on my face.  It wasn’t relief to be on the ground, but rather the realization that I had conquered fears I never knew I had. I had tested and can now attest to the fact that all you need to accomplish your goals is within you.  I met incredible people and had a great time learning about and supporting the Special Olympics of Tennessee.  And, in the end, it was a true adventure.