In The News

Bone McAllester Norton Hits the Links at Hendersonville Chamber of Commerce’s 23rd Annual Golf Classic

Golf_Scrammble_Bone_Law Golf Scramble - Bone Law

Bone McAllester Norton sponsored a hole and provided free bottles of water at the Hendersonville Chamber of Commerce’s 23rd Annual Golf Classic at the Bluegrass Yacht & Country Club. The event included a great day of golf and networking, followed by an awards ceremony in the main ballroom of the clubhouse.

The Hendersonville Area Chamber of Commerce is Sumner County’s largest chamber, representing the interests of more than 800 member businesses and 8,730 member employees throughout the area. Bone McAllester Norton attorney Marty Cook will serve as board chair of the Hendersonville Chamber of Commerce for 2019-20. Cook works in the firm’s Sumner County office and concentrates his practice in the area of small business law, commercial litigation, employment litigation and premises liability litigation. He represents clients in all aspects of litigation, arbitration and mediation.

For more information about Hendersonville Chamber of Commerce, visit its website.

Bonelaw Founder, New Attorney Participate in NAACP Sumner County Freedom Fund Banquet

The Sumner County NAACP’s 45th Annual Freedom Fund Banquet was held Saturday, Oct. 11, and Bone McAllester Norton had a strong presence in the event. Founder and chairman Charles W. Bone served as the guest speaker and tailored his message to citizens joining together for justice and equality. The firm’s newest attorney, Kee Bryant-McCormick, served as the mistress of ceremonies.

The banquet was held at First Baptist church in Gallatin, Tenn.

 

 

 

 

 

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 39 attorneys and offices in Nashville and Sumner County, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 17 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment and environmental matters. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, visit www.bonelaw.com.

James Mackler Quoted in The Tennessean Regarding 1860s Trial of Mary Surratt

Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Mackler served on a panel discussion that re-examined the 1860s trial of Mary Surratt, the first woman executed by the federal government. The Tennessean covered that discussion and quoted James.

“We were in war,” he said. “Although this was a civilian, this was a civilian being tried for war crimes. She was a civilian acting on behalf of the enemy accused by the United States of war crimes. I’m not saying that Mary Surratt was tried fairly; she was certainly not.”

 

James Mackler Quoted in The Tennessean Regarding 1860s Trial of Mary Surratt

Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Mackler served on a panel discussion that re-examined the 1860s trial of Mary Surratt, the first woman executed by the federal government. The Tennessean covered that discussion and quoted James.

“We were in war,” he said. “Although this was a civilian, this was a civilian being tried for war crimes. She was a civilian acting on behalf of the enemy accused by the United States of war crimes. I’m not saying that Mary Surratt was tried fairly; she was certainly not.”

 

Law firm seeks help for our neighbors

Posted in Gallatin News

The responsibilities we all share as Americans and as good citizens within our respective communities are important.

As we approach the upcoming holiday season, we, as a law firm, are reminded of how fortunate we are to live and work in this great county. However, despite our county's excellent reputation as one of the state's foremost marketplaces, its wealth, and its acclaimed growth, we still have those within our community who are in need.

We have many who are out of work, who have families to feed, or who may be elderly and simply do not have the resources to adequately provide food for themselves or their families.

We believe we have a responsibility to help our neighbors, who perhaps have not been as fortunate as we. To answer these calls for help within our community our law firm is initiating a campaign to facilitate the replenishing of local food bank shelves.

In the coming weeks our law firm plans to make an all-out effort through a special awareness campaign to encourage our citizenry to join with us in making contributions of cans of food and other nonperishable items to area churches and charities.

We want to ask you to help us with this very special project. This effort is about serving our community and coming to the aid of our neighbors.

We are also reminded at this time of year of how fortunate we are to be citizens of this great country. In just a few days we each will have the opportunity to perform one of our civic duties when we are asked to go to the polls and vote on Tuesday, Nov. 6.

We each plan to vote as do the other attorneys in our office and members of our staff. If you haven't already voted, we encourage you to do so. To vote is one of the most sacred privileges afforded by our great democracy. And it's the right thing to do.

Please join us in serving our community and helping our neighbors by donating cans of food to local churches and charities. To us it's much like voting. It's the right thing to do.

This guest column was submitted by Susan R. High-McAuley, William (Bill) Wright, Marshall (Marty) Cook, George J. Phillips, Johnny Garrett, and Charles Bone of the law firm Bone McAllester Norton, Hendersonville.

Law firm seeks help for our neighbors

Posted in Gallatin News
The responsibilities we all share as Americans and as good citizens within our respective communities are important.

As we approach the upcoming holiday season, we, as a law firm, are reminded of how fortunate we are to live and work in this great county. However, despite our county's excellent reputation as one of the state's foremost marketplaces, its wealth, and its acclaimed growth, we still have those within our community who are in need.

We have many who are out of work, who have families to feed, or who may be elderly and simply do not have the resources to adequately provide food for themselves or their families.

We believe we have a responsibility to help our neighbors, who perhaps have not been as fortunate as we. To answer these calls for help within our community our law firm is initiating a campaign to facilitate the replenishing of local food bank shelves.

In the coming weeks our law firm plans to make an all-out effort through a special awareness campaign to encourage our citizenry to join with us in making contributions of cans of food and other nonperishable items to area churches and charities.

We want to ask you to help us with this very special project. This effort is about serving our community and coming to the aid of our neighbors.

We are also reminded at this time of year of how fortunate we are to be citizens of this great country. In just a few days we each will have the opportunity to perform one of our civic duties when we are asked to go to the polls and vote on Tuesday, Nov. 6.

We each plan to vote as do the other attorneys in our office and members of our staff. If you haven't already voted, we encourage you to do so. To vote is one of the most sacred privileges afforded by our great democracy. And it's the right thing to do.

Please join us in serving our community and helping our neighbors by donating cans of food to local churches and charities. To us it's much like voting. It's the right thing to do.

This guest column was submitted by Susan R. High-McAuley, William (Bill) Wright, Marshall (Marty) Cook, George J. Phillips, Johnny Garrett, and Charles Bone of the law firm Bone McAllester Norton, Hendersonville.

BMN Welcomes Veteran Attorney and takes a trip to Vegas with Will Cheek

James Mackler joins Bonelaw, Hendersonville runs, Will Cheeks talks beer in Vegas and Stephen Zralek has advice on online reputation management.

Click here to read our newsletter.

 

Charles Bone Named One of Sumner County’s Top 30 Most Influential People

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that Charles Bone has been named one of Sumner’s 2010 Most Influential People.


Featured in the Tennessean, this list “reflects the diversity and variety of those who stand out as genuine movers and shakers in and around Sumner.”  No vote or survey was taken rather the editorial staff of The Hendersonville Star News, The News Examiner and Sumner A.M. selected these influential people that “one, either live in or work in, (or both), Sumer County and, two, that what they do touches the lives of many others.”


Charles Bone is currently active with the Transit Alliance of Middle Tennessee and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, as well as many other civic and charitable organizations.


Bone McAllester Norton congratulates Charles Bone on this well-deserved recognition.

Charles Bone Named One of Sumner County’s Top 30 Most Influential People

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that Charles Bone has been named one of Sumner’s 2010 Most Influential People.

Featured in the Tennessean, this list “reflects the diversity and variety of those who stand out as genuine movers and shakers in and around Sumner.”  No vote or survey was taken rather the editorial staff of The Hendersonville Star News, The News Examiner and Sumner A.M. selected these influential people that “one, either live in or work in, (or both), Sumer County and, two, that what they do touches the lives of many others.”

Charles Bone is currently active with the Transit Alliance of Middle Tennessee and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, as well as many other civic and charitable organizations.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates Charles Bone on this well-deserved recognition.

“Sumner Should Remember Neal, Willis With Pride”

Charles W. Bone’s article was published in the "Tennessee Voices" section of the Tennessean on October 29, 2010.


Sumner should remember Neal, Willis with pride
By: Charles W. Bone


With the passing this week of Jim Neal, 2010 has seen the deaths of two of Nashville’s leading lawyers, both of them natives of Sumner County. William R. Willis Jr. also died this year, at the end of July.


Bill and Jim were born 18 months apart on farms only a dozen miles apart at the beginning of the Great Depression when the total population of Sumner County (now over 160,000) was only 33,000.


As a student at Vanderbilt in the 1960s, and a Sumner County native myself, I was privileged to meet Jim and Bill on separate occasions and found both of them proud of their Sumner County heritage.


Both had been raised on farms, as I had been. Jim grew up in Oak Grove in northern Sumner County and Bill’s family lived between Gallatin and Hendersonville.


Both had been outstanding students and veterans. Both were graduates of Vanderbilt University Law School where they had outstanding scholarship achievements.


As a college student, I found both of these men to be especially warm and encouraging about the legal profession, and their enthusiasm for not just the law but for politics, the community and their profession.


A few short years later, as a new young lawyer, I found them to be welcoming and challenging, depending on whether we were working together or on opposite sides of legal matters. Whatever the case, I always found I learned something about law and life from these prominent men.


The good works of Jim Neal and Bill Willis are well-known in this community. We know of Bill’s outstanding legal representation of The Tennessean, his service to the legal profession as the chair of the Board of Professional Responsibility, and his commitment to the work of Nashville Memorial Hospital and the Memorial Foundation.


Lives of great service


Jim became known around the world for his prosecution of Jimmy Hoffa, his participation in the Watergate trials, and the many other famous cases of his great career.


Both have been recognized for their many accomplishments by many different professional and civic organizations.


Men of this caliber can be tempted by success to become arrogant and disinterested in the lives of others, especially the lives of young people. Not so with Bill Willis and Jim Neal. I am especially thankful that these two fine lawyers took an interest in one other young man from Sumner County.


I was blessed by their willingness to befriend and mentor me as a person, and I know I am only one of many lawyers today who will always remember Bill Willis and Jim Neal as heroes of our profession and our community.