In The News

Push for “Tylers Law” After Lawsuit Victory

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys David Briley, John Branham and Charles Robert Bone prevailed at trial for Don and Sarah Sinclair, the parents of an 18-month old boy who were denied the opportunity to see their son after he died suddenly in June 2008 while with a caregiver.


The jury awarded a verdict of punitive damages in the amount of $1.25 million and $300,000 in compensatory damages against Forensic Medical Management Services PLC, the firm that handles medical-examiner duties for Metro Nashville.


Along with four of the twelve jurors, Bone McAllester Norton is pushing to pass “Tylers Law,” a law to ensure no family is ever denied the opportunity to see their deceased child.  This follows a Florida law which guarantees a family the right to see their child after death and before autopsy.


"The circumstances indicated that there was no reason to prevent the parents from seeing their son," said David Briley.


"It's unfortunate that you have to change the law to impose common sense on people. Families need to make that visual connection and begin the process of healing and putting things in order. That's very important. It happened. But to them it is still not real. It's not real until they actually see their son."


NewsChannel5.com ran a story, "Lawsuit Victory Could Pave the Way for New State Law," on this case.


 

Push for “Tylers Law” After Lawsuit Victory

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys David Briley, John Branham and Charles Robert Bone prevailed at trial for Don and Sarah Sinclair, the parents of an 18-month old boy who were denied the opportunity to see their son after he died suddenly in June 2008 while with a caregiver.

The jury awarded a verdict of punitive damages in the amount of $1.25 million and $300,000 in compensatory damages against Forensic Medical Management Services PLC, the firm that handles medical-examiner duties for Metro Nashville.

Along with four of the twelve jurors, Bone McAllester Norton is pushing to pass “Tylers Law,” a law to ensure no family is ever denied the opportunity to see their deceased child.  This follows a Florida law which guarantees a family the right to see their child after death and before autopsy.

"The circumstances indicated that there was no reason to prevent the parents from seeing their son," said David Briley.

"It's unfortunate that you have to change the law to impose common sense on people. Families need to make that visual connection and begin the process of healing and putting things in order. That's very important. It happened. But to them it is still not real. It's not real until they actually see their son."

NewsChannel5.com ran a story, "Lawsuit Victory Could Pave the Way for New State Law," on this case.