In The News

Vanderbilt Law School Welcomes Will Cheek and Tucker Herndon for Whiskey Industry Discussion

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys William T. Cheek and C. Tucker Herndon will participate in a panel discussion for Vanderbilt Law School on Thursday, March 12. The Vanderbilt University Law School Cork & Tap Society is hosting a panel discussion on the legal issues facing the alcoholic beverage industry in the state. It will be co-sponsored by the Vanderbilt Intellectual Property Society as well as the Vanderbilt Law and Business Society.

Will and Tucker are members of the firm’s Alcoholic Beverage Law team, which provides federal, state and local licensing and regulatory compliance advice to clients in the restaurant, hotel, bar, club and resort industries.

 

 

 

 

 

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 38 attorneys and offices in Nashville, Sumner and Williamson counties, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 18 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment and environmental matters. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, visit www.bonelaw.com.

“Take Victim’s Rights Seriously,” Ed Yarbrough Tells the Tennessean

Bone McAllester Norton attorney Edward M. Yarbrough spoke with the Tennessean yesterday about how the state’s laws on open records, fair trials and victims’ privacy rights converge as cases move through the courts. The subject was the Vanderbilt rape case, which was heard in appeals court Monday. A media coalition filed lawsuit after being denied case information, including text messages sent between players and coaches following the incident that took place last June in a Vanderbilt dorm. Presiding Judge Frank G. Clement, Jr. questioned why media should have access to such records prior to the trial.

“. . .if we need to go a little further than we would like to restrict the Public Records Act, then we should do it,” Ed told reporter Tony Gonzalez. “The time has come to take victim’s rights seriously and put them right up there with civil rights and all constitutional rights.”

Read the full story here.

 

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is a full-service law firm with 38 attorneys and offices in Nashville and Sumner County, Tennessee. Our attorneys focus on 17 distinct practice areas, providing the wide range of legal services ordinarily required by established and growing businesses and entrepreneurs. Among our practices, we represent clients in business and capital formation, mergers and acquisitions, securities matters, commercial lending and creditors’ rights, commercial real estate and development, governmental regulatory matters, commercial litigation and dispute resolution, intellectual property strategy and enforcement, entertainment and environmental matters. Our client base reflects the firm’s deep understanding and coverage of today’s leading industry and business segments. For more information, visit www.bonelaw.com.

Attorney Johnny Garrett Invites Vanderbilt's Baseball Coach to Little League World Series

Nashville's City Paper
By Jerome Boettcher

Tim Corbin wasn’t too old for this moment.
Attending the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa., always had been on his baseball bucket list. On Sunday, the giddy 51-year-old boarded a private jet and fulfilled that dream.

Vanderbilt's baseball coach couldn’t pass up an opportunity to cheer on Nashville’s “hometown” team and was in the stands to watch the Goodlettsville All-Stars knock off Petaluma, Calif., in an exciting second-round game.

“It was better in person than it is on TV. I can say that with certainty,” Corbin said on Monday, back at Vanderbilt and preparing for the Commodores’ first team meeting. “It kind of reveals every aspect of youth baseball that you can possibly see from the emotion to the winning and losing and the fans and the parents. It is really neat. It is the elite deal. It is the thing happening right now. I think it is great for the community.”

Corbin left Nashville at 7 a.m. Sunday and was back by 9 p.m. that same day, turning a 1,500-mile (roundtrip) adventure into a very long day trip. He joined Johnny Garrett, Ray Knotts and Brian Hayes, parents and coaches of Goodlettsville’s 8- and 9-year-old team who extended Corbin an offer to join them and their children on the trip.