In The News

BoneLaw Attorney Rob Pinson discusses Nonprofit Candidate Endorsement


Bone McAllester Norton attorney Rob Pinson discusses general tax-exempt status of nonprofits and the rules and regulations associated with such organizations.

If you are a nonprofit with a 501(c)(3) tax exempt status you are not allowed to endorse candidates or participate in any campaigns for elective public office.  This includes not sharing opinions or offering voting suggestions or advice.

To watch/read News 2's Nick Caloway's story, click here.

Rob Pinson is an attorney with Bone McAllester Norton. He concentrates his practice in the field of alcoholic beverage law, with an emphasis on the manufacturing tier. Rob represents numerous distilleries, wineries and breweries across the United States and is pro bono counsel to the Tennessee Distillers’ Guild. Rob also represents clients in business law, tax law, and campaign finance law. Rob offers an impressive track record when it comes to navigating the complexities of the alcoholic beverage laws as well as state and federal taxes.

Client Opening a Craft cidery in the Wedgewood-Houston Neighborhood

Who knew as Nashville becomes more and more the "IT" city that we'd actually develop our own distillery district?  With the influx of distillers into the area called the Wedgewood-Houston Neighborhood, this location is becoming known as the distillery district of Nashville.

The Wedgewood-Houston Neighborhood is a growing, trendy area a few blocks south of downtown.  For anyone who has ever sat in rush-hour traffic, this is a welcome residential area.  For vendors wanting a convenient location, the area is equally as attractive.

The Tennessean is reporting the sale of a building to our clients who will soon be opening Diskin Cider.

To read the full article, click here.

NBJ Takes a Look at Employee Retention in our Growing City

The Nashville Business Journal has talked to several industries within Nashville regarding the growth of the city and how to protect your top employees, including our own CEO, Charles Robert Bone.

To read all articles related to Talent War:  How to protect your top employees, check out this week's Nashville Business Journal, here.

"Non-compete contracts aren't commonplace in the legal field," Bone said.  "We take a proactive approach to retention.  Every attorney is a member.  We have no partners, and everyone is compensated by the same formula.  We've tried to be very intentional creating a structure where every member is equal and has ownership in the firm."

Welcome Attorney Jonathan R. Burns

Jonathan R. BurnsJonathan R. BurnsNASHVILLE, TN -  July 12, 2016 - Bone McAllester Norton PLLC is pleased to announce that Jonathan R. Burns has joined the firm.

Jonathan R. Burns concentrates his law practice in the areas of estate planning, probate, corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, real estate and taxation.

“Adding Jonathan contributes to our strategic growth plan for the firm,” said Chairman Charles W. Bone. “He brings significant experience in the estate planning and taxation areas of law which is especially important to our clients.  He’s a welcome new member of our dynamic group of highly skilled attorneys.”

Jonathan received his J.D. from the University of Mississippi in 2010 and received his L.L.M. in Taxation from Washington University in St. Louis in 2011.  He graduated cum laude from Middle Tennessee State University in 2006 with a Bachelor in Business Administration degree.  Jonathan is licensed to practice in both Tennessee and Mississippi.

Before joining Bone McAllester Norton, Jonathan practiced law with Watkins & McNeilly where he was able to develop his skills in the areas of business law and estate planning.

For the full release, please click here.

Marty Cook Leading Legal Counsel for Clarendale of Hendersonville

Marshall T. “Marty” CookMarshall T. “Marty” CookHendersonville's popular Indian Lake area is getting a $40 million senior living community.  The development, Clarendale of Hendersonville will be at the corner of Indian Lake Boulevard   and Maple Drive housing 184 units with several amenities including dining, a crafts room, a library and a billiards room.

The development is a joint venture between Ryan Companies and LCSMarty Cook of Bone McAllester Norton is serving as legal counsel for the project.

For more information, the original press release is here.

The article has been featured in the Nashville Post and REJournals.com.

It's An Exciting Day for Wine and Grocery Stores in Tennessee

It is hard not to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of this day.  Even as I left for work this morning the traffic at my local Kroger was heavier.  We've heard several reports from our co-workers that there wasn't even parking available at Trader Joes this morning in Green Hills!

 Two Buck ChuckTwo Buck ChuckRumor has it that if you're looking for some Two Buck Chuck, you might be out of luck today.

Looks like The Tennessean has done a great job regaling the timeline of this morning's sales across the mid-state.  To read the article, click here.

Drink responsibly of course, and enjoy this historic day!

From all the attorneys, legal assistants and paralegals here at Bone McAllester Norton who have worked tirelessly through the licensing process we wish you a happy and safe Fourth of July!

What will be the next alcohol law to change?

William T. Cheek IIIWilliam T. Cheek IIIThe NBJ recently published an article about the future of alcohol law in Tennessee.  After an historic few years, July 1 marked the day that WIGS went live.  (To those of us in the industry, we refer to Wine In Grocery Stores as, WIGS.)

Nashville Business Journal reporter, Jacob Steimer, sat down with liquor law expert and BoneLaw attorney, Will Cheek, to discuss what's next.

Cheek offered some interesting insight into the Jan. 1 availability of high-gravity beer in grocery stores and discussed the pitfalls of wine on Sundays.

To read the full article, click here.

In summary, the next big battle will be liquor. At this time, you can go to the grocery store and buy wine, but you cannot purchase liquor.

The Future of Alcohol in Tennessee

Attorney Will Cheek has been quoted in a great article about the future of alcohol in Tennessee in the Nashville Scene.  To read the entire article, click here.

Nashville Scene Cover – 6/30/16Nashville Scene Cover – 6/30/16We are hours away from 8 am, July 1, 2016 - the moment when nearly 500 retail stores across the state will be able to legally sell wine.

Bone McAllester Norton June Newsletter

[iframe src="https://t.e2ma.net/message/nb027/fhnavi" width="100%" height="5000"]

How Litigation in Nashville is Different than in Bigger Cities

I get asked a lot to serve as local counsel on cases for lawyers from LA, New York, Chicago and DC.  (I also end up hiring lawyers in those cities.)  Sometimes we’re asked to play a minor role – some call this “elbow counsel,” where we’re really just on the case in name only.  Generally, though, lead counsel sees that we can offer valuable insight into not just the substantive law but also the local landscape.  And I assure you the landscape here in Nashville is much different than it is in larger cities.

Given the sheer size of bigger cities, lawyers there often never appear more than once in front of the same judge and often never interact with the same opposing counsel.  With the virtual anonymity that comes with the territory in those jurisdictions, lawyers have every reason to practice scorched-earth litigation.  They can be as ruthless as they want – no one knows who they are and, very likely, no one will ever see them again.

Practice here in Nashville is completely different.  Although our city is booming, we have only four active U.S. District Judges and only four chancellors at the state court level.  In this big small town, everyone knows everyone. And how you conduct yourself in a single case can be remembered for the rest of your career.  Although we advocate zealously, we refuse to stab each other in the back.   And we know how easy it is to be short-sighted.  Given the close-knit relationships here, we still litigate with a Southern gentility, or what the profession calls “civility.”  I hope it always stays this way, even as we grow and welcome newcomers from other jurisdictions.