In The News

Video: Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone.  My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel. 

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Last night was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen.  With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media."  We had a great crowd and a good conversation.  For a link to the video, go here





WaterCooler goes to Corsair Distillery for Exclusive Tasting & Tour

 
If you missed the last WaterCooler, you missed a great event!  Nashville's only distillery, Corsair, gave us a behind-the-scenes tour of how they make and distill what is quickly becoming one of the most sought-after small batch liquors in the U.S. when they hosted us in April 2011.
Located in Marathon Village, which used to house Yazoo Brewery, Corsair had to work mighty hard to even get up and running in Tennessee.
Darek Bell

Because Tennessee's laws and Nashville's laws were so onerous, Corsair actually began in Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Only after they were able to convince the state and local lawmakers to allow them to "manufacture intoxicating liquors" were they able to come back home.
As part of a private event for WaterCooler, co-owners Darek Bell and Andrew Webber showed us around, told the story behind Corsair, and gave us samples in their tasting room.  The Tennessean just reported that members of the public won't get this same opportunity until the laws are changed.
Andrew Webber
To join the invitation list and receive news about upcoming WaterCooler events, shoot me an email. Thanks to everyone who showed up.  See you at the next on on May 9 at Conexion Americas!

Here are some photos from WaterCooler at Corsair:












Video on Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone. My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel.

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Speaking at Lipscomb was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen. With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media." We had a great crowd and a good conversation. Here's a few minutes from my presentation that we recorded.



Video on Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media

I was recently invited to speak on "Digital Citizenship and the First Amendment" at The Leadership and Civility in a Digital Age speaker series, presented by Lipscomb University’s Nelson & Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Department of Communication and Journalism and by Centerstone. My friend Debi Tate, a former commissioner on the FCC, invited me to join First Amendment scholar Gene Policinsky on the panel.

Typically when I speak on legal issues in social media, it is to an audience of business leaders or marketing professionals.  Speaking at Lipscomb was an opportunity to look at these issues from the perspective of the individual consumer and citizen. With that in mind, I titled my talk "Protecting Your Family & Your Reputation when Using Social Media." We had a great crowd and a good conversation. Here's a few minutes from my presentation that we recorded.



Music & Margaritas: Preview Party for Conexion Americas' Annual Breakfast

How lucky was it to stumble upon the first night of incredible weather in early April when we held a garden party kicking off the annual breakfast for my favorite non-profit in town Conexion Americas?

We called it "Music & Margaritas."

Everyone expected a good margarita and some great conversation, but no one expected to hear "Rumba," the number one band in Nashville's corporate band challenge, hosted by the Arts & Business Council!  When my friend Leon said he would take care of the music, we thought he meant he and another guy would bring their guitars, but he showed up with an entire Latino rock band.  Incredible.

Conexion Americas serves as a bridge between the established community in Nashville and the recently-arriving Latino community.  Its mission is to promote the social, economic and civic advancement of Latino families in Middle Tennessee.  It was a great chance for friends to learn about the amazing work of Conexion Americas, and a great opportunity for Conexion Americas to make some new friends.

Mark your calendars for the annual breakfast on May 26 at 7:30am at Loews Vanderbilt!

Here are some photos from Music & Margaritas:











Music & Margaritas: Preview Party for Conexion Americas' Annual Breakfast

How lucky was it to stumble upon the first night of incredible weather in early April when we held a garden party kicking off the annual breakfast for my favorite non-profit in town Conexion Americas?

We called it "Music & Margaritas."

Everyone expected a good margarita and some great conversation, but no one expected to hear "Rumba," the number one band in Nashville's corporate band challenge, hosted by the Arts & Business Council!  When my friend Leon said he would take care of the music, we thought he meant he and another guy would bring their guitars, but he showed up with an entire Latino rock band.  Incredible.

Conexion Americas serves as a bridge between the established community in Nashville and the recently-arriving Latino community.  Its mission is to promote the social, economic and civic advancement of Latino families in Middle Tennessee.  It was a great chance for friends to learn about the amazing work of Conexion Americas, and a great opportunity for Conexion Americas to make some new friends.

Mark your calendars for the annual breakfast on May 26 at 7:30am at Loews Vanderbilt!

Here are some photos from Music & Margaritas:











James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.


  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.


Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.


Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.








 

James Crumlin Recognized on “Forty Under 40” List by Nashville Business Journal

Bone McAllester Norton is proud to announce that James Crumlin was named to the Nashville Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” list.

  The annual awards go to young professionals who are making a difference in their companies and their community in Middle Tennessee.  The winners were honored at an awards ceremony on March 10.  At the ceremony, each winner was invited to say THREE WORDS.  As added twist, each winner could say additional words with the understanding that if you said four or more words, the winner would make a $25 donation PER WORD to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT).  As the Immediate Past President of the Board of Directors for BBBSMT, James said 56 words at the ceremony which translated to a $1,400 contribution.

Bone McAllester Norton congratulates James on this well-deserved recognition.

Click here for a full list of this year’s winners.

 

Bone McAllester Norton Hosts Tennessee Bankers Association "Day on the Hill" Luncheon


Cheeseburgers in paradise?  What do Jimmy Buffett and a group of bankers and lawyers have in common?


Our financial institutions team hosted banking professionals from across the state at Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville in downtown Nashville a few weeks ago as part of their annual “Day on the Hill” event.  As a proud associate member of the Tennessee Bankers Association and committed legal partner in the Tennessee banking community, Bone McAllester Norton enjoyed supporting this annual program as the luncheon sponsor for the second year.


Held annually, the “Day on the Hill” program is organized by the Tennessee Bankers Association’s Young Bankers Division to provide an opportunity for current and future leaders from banks across the state to explore the inner workings of the Tennessee legislative process.  Trace Blankenship, one of our attorneys who advises bank executives and boards of directors on strategic transactions and regulatory matters, emceed the event, which featured a keynote address from the commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions, Greg Gonzales, and remarks about Tennessee’s banking industry from the law firm’s chairman, Charles W. Bone.  Several attorneys from our financial institutions team described “Eleven Things That Could Keep a Banker Awake at Night” (and some hair-raising stories to illustrate) including Jack Stringham, Charles Robert Bone, David Anthony, Andrea Perry, Johnny Garrett, Rob Pinson and Tucker Herndon.  Tracie Lomax, immediate past president of the Young Bankers Division, and Jay England, incoming president, welcomed the group, and officials of the Tennessee Bankers Association, Tim Amos, Colin Barrett, Amy Smith, were responsible for organizing the “Day on the Hill” event.


 

Protecting Patient Privacy in Discarded Medical Records

Over the past few years, physician practices have implemented many policies and procedures to protect their patients' privacy in an effort to comply with the Privacy and Security Rule under HIPAA.


 They have adopted compliance plans and procedures to protect their patients' privacy in the transmission and storage and use of their protected health information (“PHI”).  The need to protect the privacy and security of this information does not end when the medical record is no longer needed by the practice.  Failing to implement reasonable safeguards to protect PHI in connection with disposal of your medical records could result in impermissible disclosures of PHI with the same risks and penalties as the disclosure of information from active medical records. In addition to the policies that your office has in place to secure its active medical records, every medical office should have developed a HIPAA compliant policy to dispose of medical records that are no longer part of a patients active medical file. This is particularly important in the age of electronic records. Any procedures for the proper disposal of medical records should specifically address the disposition of electronic PHI and the hardware or electronic media, such as PCs, hard drives, and disks, on which it is stored.


A physician’s office may not simply abandon PHI or dispose of it in dumpsters or other containers that are accessible by the public or other unauthorized persons. However, the Privacy and Security Rules do not provide any particular disposal method for PHI that will guarantee compliance. Instead, a practice should determine what is reasonable for their office and consider a methods potential risks to patient privacy, keeping in mind the form, type, and amount of PHI to be disposed of. For instance, the disposal of certain types of PHI such as name, social security number, driver’s license number, debit or credit card number, diagnosis, treatment information, or other sensitive information may warrant more care due to the risk that inappropriate access to this information may result in identity theft, employment or other discrimination, or harm to an individual’s reputation.


The Office of Civil Rights provides some guidance for disposing of PHI.  Depending on the circumstances, proper disposal methods may include (but are not limited to):


• Shredding or otherwise destroying PHI in paper records so that the PHI is rendered essentially unreadable, indecipherable, and otherwise cannot be reconstructed prior to it being placed in a dumpster or other trash receptacle;


• Maintaining PHI for disposal in a secure area and using a disposal vendor as a business associate to pick up and shred or otherwise destroy the PHI;


• In justifiable cases, based on the size and the type of the covered entity, and the nature of the PHI, depositing PHI in locked dumpsters that are accessible only by authorized persons, such as appropriate refuse workers;


• For PHI on electronic media, clearing (using software or hardware products to overwrite media with non-sensitive data), purging (degaussing or exposing the media to a strong magnetic field in order to disrupt the recorded magnetic domains), or destroying the media (disintegration, pulverization, melting, incinerating, or shredding).


There are also outside vendors who can assist a medical practice to appropriately dispose of PHI on its behalf.