In The News

Best Practices for Businesses: Tip #1: Adopt a Social Media Policy

According to a February 14, 2011 article on Mashable.com "social media is predicted to see one of the biggest increases in online marketing spending this year."  With that in mind, businesses need to adopt and implement a social media policy.  In fact, they should implement two policies: one for all employees, and another for those employees responsible for official social media communications on behalf of the business. Some businesses may say that there's no need to have a social media policy because they aren't officially engaged in social media.  Even if a business doesn't officially participate in social media, you can bet its employees are on Facebook or Twitter.  They're definitely using social media after work, but probably using it during working hours, too.  Their unofficial use of social media makes it important for businesses to set some guidelines.Businesses should consider adopting two separate policies:1.  A social media policy for ALL employees.  Businesses should provide all employees general guidelines on certain matters, for example: keeping business matters confidential, affirming that employees should have no expectation of privacy for anything posted on a publicly-accessible site, and reminding employees that they should clarify that any opinion expressed is made in their individual capacity, not on behalf of their employer.  In light of a recent NLRB settlement with a Connecticut ambulance company who disciplined an employee for making negative comments about her employer on Facebook, businesses should be very reluctant to limit employees' right to discuss the terms of their employment (like wages and conditions).  Businesses should adopt this policy even if they do not officially engage in social media as a company.2.  A policy for employees responsible for official social media communications of the business.  Those employees responsible for communicating on behalf of the company through social media need guidelines.  They need to know what is acceptable language, how to respond to negative reviews of the business, and their responsibilities when inviting user generated content.  There are laws governing marketing to minors and regulations requiring disclosure of any material connection between a blogger and a business.  These are just a few of the items a business should consider when crafting its social media policy.

James Crumlin Interviewed in Article “Checking Candidates’ Credit: Good Idea?”

Borrowman Baker, LLC, BV Staffing + Consulting recently featured Bone McAllester Norton attorney James Crumlin in an article addressing the usefulness of credit checks when hiring new staff.


“Is the information you will receive through the credit check essential to the job you're trying to fill? If it's not absolutely clear that it is, you're better off using other forms of background checks” states James.


Click here to read “Checking Candidates’ Credit: Good Idea?”


 

Olive and Sinclair's Experience: Secrets to Success for Any Business

On January 31, 2011, I sat down to talk with Scott Witherow, owner of Olive and Sinclair Chocolate Co. , which makes the South's best chocolate.
 
Olive & Sinclair’s Exclusive with Williams-SonomaOlive & Sinclair’s Exclusive with Williams-Sonoma
Later that night, he hosted WaterCooler, a monthly networking event for young entrepreneurs that some friends and I co-founded in August 2009.  We had a jam-packed crowd of over 40 people.  Everyone, it seems, wants to learn more about this company.  (For another great write-up on the tasting, check out the recent post on Nashville Foodies' blog, or see Gwyneth Paltrow's blog "Goop," which highlighted O&S.)

Begun just 13 months ago in September 2009, Olive and Sinclair’s growth has been as viral as a posting on Facebook or Twitter.  O&S has already gained an exclusive contract with Williams-Sonoma for some of its products, and the demand for its chocolate grows every day.

We met after work at the office of O&S, which doubles as factory, research and design center, marketing headquarters, and nerve-center for all things chocolate in Nashville.  Before everyone from WaterCooler arrived, Scott offered me a sneak-preview sample of an upcoming chocolate he plans to launch in the coming weeks, something he’s collaborating on with Benton’s Smoky Mountain Country Hams.  To top it off, he offered me the perfect pairing of a  Terrapin Moo-Hoo Chocolate Milk Stout, which also has O&S chocolate in it.  Talk about a rich combination.  This was better than any of the after-school snacks I ate as a kid!

Here’s my take-away from talking with Scott, and what I think are some of the biggest secrets of his success. To be honest, I think these are some of the best keys to any modern business’s prosperity:

1. Authenticity: Olive & Sinclair offers an authentic story and product.

2. Collaboration: O&S collaborates with Terrapin, Drew’s Brews, Williams Sonoma, Bongo Java, and even non-profits like Saddle Up.

3. Embracing Social Media: Scott told me they couldn’t have had this massive growth and success without using social media. Only a 13 month old company, O&S has already grown to over 500 retail and wholesale customers.
 
O&S Red Hot Hearts for Valentine’s DayO&S Red Hot Hearts for Valentine’s Day
 
Here’s the best parts of my conversation with Scott:
Zralek: Thank you for the Terrapin Moo Hoo Chocolate Milk Stout…awesome! You were saying that social media has without questions helped your business…tell me how.

Witherow: Obviously it allows us to communicate with anybody out there that’s interested in Oliver & Sinclair. But because we’ve also been blessed with some pretty ridiculous—in a good way—articles. It’s allowed for people to actually kind of let us have a face. We were doing a lot more on Facebook and blogging before we ever even had a website. So that was a big part of it.

ZRALEK: Part of what I find in my work representing businesses as a lawyer is that, when people who are older than us (both in our 30s) are running companies, they often question the value of social media.

WITHEROW: Yeah.

ZRALEK: And to me, companies like yours are a prime example of how social media can help fuel the explosive growth you’ve experienced.

WITHEROW: I think for me and the company, I think that we all just believe in this product. We’re not…we don’t necessarily get into chocolate as like a monetary thing, you know, to make like a bazillion dollars. So it started off with just kind of loving the idea of being able to make chocolate. And then for me it was—I want to make chocolate personable and…I don’t know what this sounds like. But I think that we were successful in making it approachable and, again I don’t mean it arrogantly, but I think we do make a good product, and I think that social media is hugely important as long as you have a good product.

ZRALEK: I agree.

WITHEROW: But I think…

ZRALEK: If you’ve got nothing behind it, it doesn’t matter.

WITHEROW: Yeah, if it’s all this kind of chutes and ladders then you’re only going to go so far with it. But I think that—it’s been great even getting feedback, good and bad. I mean there have been people that have shot me a message on Facebook saying something was up or they noticed something and, like we had one customer who got a chocolate bar that wasn’t up to their standards of what they thought O&S was. And so she Facebooked me and, with the a batch number that we include on every bar, we found out where she bought it. It was poor product placement and it was such an old bar…I mean such an old bar that it shouldn’t have been on the shelf. So we had to go in and make sure that they were off the shelf and that our batch numbers are—they’re done for a reason. So that’s a great part to me.

ZRALEK: So this beer that you’re letting me taste, what’s the best chocolate that goes with it?

WITHEROW: [Handing me a sample of an upcoming release where O&S is collaborating with Benton’s Hams.] It will be a little while before it’s out.

ZRALEK: So what is that that I just tasted?

WITHEROW: It’s a smoked nib.

ZRALEK: From Benton’s Farm…they’re teaming with you?

WITHEROW: Yeah, we’re kind of teaming up for a little project. Hopefully we’ll see it through.

ZRALEK: And what’s that made of…it’s so good. Is there some bacon in there?

WITHEROW: No, [it’s just] nibs [that] are smoked by Alan down in Madisonville.

ZRALEK: So it’s more of the smoked flavor than the bacon.

WITHEROW: Yeah, there is no bacon in there really because it’s just…it’s Alan good quality smoked [flavor]…

ZRALEK: Wow it tastes good. . . .
 
Tasting of Various O&S ChocolateTasting of Various O&S Chocolate
ZRALEK: [W]hen did you decide to start this [company]?

WITHEROW: That was somewhere 2008 sometime, I think.

ZRALEK: What were you doing before Oliver & Sinclair?

WITHEROW: Just working in kitchens here in town. At the time I was a pastry chef at F. Scott’s.

ZRALEK: I didn’t know that.

WITHEROW: Yeah, I was there for about three years

ZRALEK: Did you go to culinary school somewhere?

WITHEROW: Yeah I went to Le Cordon Bleu.

ZRALEK: So you don’t recommend just anybody deciding to start their own chocolate shop? Having a little training comes in handy?

WITHEROW: Yeah but I didn’t learn how to make chocolate in culinary school. They didn’t guarantee me that. It’s more of working with chocolate. And I always try telling people it’s kind of like people that really like craft beers tend to start home brewing at some point. And I worked a lot with chocolate so I learned how to make my own chocolate. And I just started doing it.

ZRALEK: Where did you sell to first? Who was your first buyer?

WITHEROW: Mitchell’s Deli.  [Mitchell’s, the best deli in Nashville, is literally upstairs from Olive and Sinclair.]

ZRALEK: Are you selling primarily in Middle Tennessee?

WITHEROW: No, we’re nationwide and in Canada.

ZRALEK: So you started in ’08, it’s now January 2011…

WITHEROW: Well, I say we started in ’08. I started experimenting in ’08 and making test batches.

ZRALEK: So when was your first sale?

WITHEROW: September of 2009.

ZRALEK: Wow. You’re a young company.

WITHEROW: Yeah. We’re a year and three months.

ZRALEK: That’s great. . . .

ZRALEK: [O]bviously you wear a lot of hats. I assume that you [serve as] creative director, HR director, CEO, chief culinary designer and are you also making house calls to these places or do you send somebody else out there for you?

WITHEROW: We don’t call on anybody. We don’t approach someone in hopes that they’ll sell our chocolate. Maybe the first two months some of that went on, maybe three, probably two. But we really tried to slow down after that. We did some here and there during brief interims where we kind of thought it was getting quiet and you start to get kind of nervous as a new company or whatever. And you think well we need to pick up the phone and start cold-calling. But I think that we’ve all really found that just holding tight and just getting the product out there and in other ways. Yeah, that’s kind of how we do it.

ZRALEK: Let me ask you who you’ve teamed up with in terms of making chocolate. So you’ve teamed up with Benton’s Hams.

WITHEROW: Yeah, with Alan. And that’s a new something.

ZRALEK: So that’s on its way. Who else have you teamed up with if anybody?

WITHEROW: Well we teamed up with Terrapin, you know, for the Moo Hoo. And we look at all the local guys. I called the Yazoo boys [Linus Hall and his team] and made sure that [they didn’t mind] cause they’re the home team, so…
ZRALEK: Have you done anything with a coffee company yet?

WITHEROW: Yeah, we do stuff with Bob Bernstein [at Bongo Java]  in our normal coffee line. And then we do a line that’s exclusively at Williams-Sonoma [and one] that we do with my buddy Drew [of Drew’s Brew’s].  And it’s a totally different chocolate and a totally different roasted coffee. So it’s kind of a new interpretation of that.

ZRALEK: Okay, one last question…

WITHEROW: Yazoo as well. I gotta say we have teamed up with Yazoo…

ZRALEK: …and you’re drinking Yazoo as we’re talking.

WITHEROW: Yeah.

ZRALEK: So a good loyal follower.

WITHEROW: Yeah, I’m a big fan.

ZRALEK: Who do you see as your main competitor and who do you see—that’s probably a bad term—but who do you see as…is there any other chocolatier in the US that you think does a really good job like you do?

WITHEROW: I don’t want to look at them as competition. I guess in a way I kind of have to. But…

ZRALEK: Who else is a local chocolatier that you like?

WITHEROW: Well, just to…we’re not really chocolatiers. We don’t make truffles, we don’t…

ZRALEK: Chocolate company…what’s the right word?

WITHEROW: We’re chocolate makers. We import beans [then roast them and temper them].

ZRALEK: So who else does it like you do?

WITHEROW: Nobody in Tennessee.
 
Imported Cocoa Beans at O&SImported Cocoa Beans at O&S 

Copyright Stephen J. Zralek 2011 ©. All Rights Reserved.

Olive and Sinclair's Experience: Secrets to Success for Any Business

On January 31, 2011, I sat down to talk with Scott Witherow, owner of Olive and Sinclair Chocolate Co. , which makes the South's best chocolate.









Olive & Sinclair's Exclusive with Williams-Sonoma

Later that night, he hosted WaterCooler, a monthly networking event for young entrepreneurs that some friends and I co-founded in August 2009.  We had a jam-packed crowd of over 40 people.  Everyone, it seems, wants to learn more about this company.  (For another great write-up on the tasting, check out the recent post on Nashville Foodies' blog, or see Gwyneth Paltrow's blog "Goop," which highlighted O&S.)

Begun just 13 months ago in September 2009, Olive and Sinclair’s growth has been as viral as a posting on Facebook or Twitter.  O&S has already gained an exclusive contract with Williams-Sonoma for some of its products, and the demand for its chocolate grows every day.

We met after work at the office of O&S, which doubles as factory, research and design center, marketing headquarters, and nerve-center for all things chocolate in Nashville.  Before everyone from WaterCooler arrived, Scott offered me a sneak-preview sample of an upcoming chocolate he plans to launch in the coming weeks, something he’s collaborating on with Benton’s Smoky Mountain Country Hams.  To top it off, he offered me the perfect pairing of a  Terrapin Moo-Hoo Chocolate Milk Stout, which also has O&S chocolate in it.  Talk about a rich combination.  This was better than any of the after-school snacks I ate as a kid!

Here’s my take-away from talking with Scott, and what I think are some of the biggest secrets of his success. To be honest, I think these are some of the best keys to any modern business’s prosperity:

1. Authenticity: Olive & Sinclair offers an authentic story and product.

2. Collaboration: O&S collaborates with Terrapin, Drew’s Brews, Williams Sonoma, Bongo Java, and even non-profits like Saddle Up.

3. Embracing Social Media: Scott told me they couldn’t have had this massive growth and success without using social media. Only a 13 month old company, O&S has already grown to over 500 retail and wholesale customers.










O&S Red Hot Hearts for Valentine's Day

Here’s the best parts of my conversation with Scott:
Zralek: Thank you for the Terrapin Moo Hoo Chocolate Milk Stout…awesome! You were saying that social media has without questions helped your business…tell me how.

Witherow: Obviously it allows us to communicate with anybody out there that’s interested in Oliver & Sinclair. But because we’ve also been blessed with some pretty ridiculous—in a good way—articles. It’s allowed for people to actually kind of let us have a face. We were doing a lot more on Facebook and blogging before we ever even had a website. So that was a big part of it.

ZRALEK: Part of what I find in my work representing businesses as a lawyer is that, when people who are older than us (both in our 30s) are running companies, they often question the value of social media.

WITHEROW: Yeah.

ZRALEK: And to me, companies like yours are a prime example of how social media can help fuel the explosive growth you’ve experienced.

WITHEROW: I think for me and the company, I think that we all just believe in this product. We’re not…we don’t necessarily get into chocolate as like a monetary thing, you know, to make like a bazillion dollars. So it started off with just kind of loving the idea of being able to make chocolate. And then for me it was—I want to make chocolate personable and…I don’t know what this sounds like. But I think that we were successful in making it approachable and, again I don’t mean it arrogantly, but I think we do make a good product, and I think that social media is hugely important as long as you have a good product.

ZRALEK: I agree.

WITHEROW: But I think…

ZRALEK: If you’ve got nothing behind it, it doesn’t matter.

WITHEROW: Yeah, if it’s all this kind of chutes and ladders then you’re only going to go so far with it. But I think that—it’s been great even getting feedback, good and bad. I mean there have been people that have shot me a message on Facebook saying something was up or they noticed something and, like we had one customer who got a chocolate bar that wasn’t up to their standards of what they thought O&S was. And so she Facebooked me and, with the a batch number that we include on every bar, we found out where she bought it. It was poor product placement and it was such an old bar…I mean such an old bar that it shouldn’t have been on the shelf. So we had to go in and make sure that they were off the shelf and that our batch numbers are—they’re done for a reason. So that’s a great part to me.

ZRALEK: So this beer that you’re letting me taste, what’s the best chocolate that goes with it?

WITHEROW: [Handing me a sample of an upcoming release where O&S is collaborating with Benton’s Hams.] It will be a little while before it’s out.

ZRALEK: So what is that that I just tasted?

WITHEROW: It’s a smoked nib.

ZRALEK: From Benton’s Farm…they’re teaming with you?

WITHEROW: Yeah, we’re kind of teaming up for a little project. Hopefully we’ll see it through.

ZRALEK: And what’s that made of…it’s so good. Is there some bacon in there?

WITHEROW: No, [it’s just] nibs [that] are smoked by Alan down in Madisonville.

ZRALEK: So it’s more of the smoked flavor than the bacon.

WITHEROW: Yeah, there is no bacon in there really because it’s just…it’s Alan good quality smoked [flavor]…

ZRALEK: Wow it tastes good. . . .










Tasting of Various O&S Chocolate

ZRALEK: [W]hen did you decide to start this [company]?

WITHEROW: That was somewhere 2008 sometime, I think.

ZRALEK: What were you doing before Oliver & Sinclair?

WITHEROW: Just working in kitchens here in town. At the time I was a pastry chef at F. Scott’s.

ZRALEK: I didn’t know that.

WITHEROW: Yeah, I was there for about three years

ZRALEK: Did you go to culinary school somewhere?

WITHEROW: Yeah I went to Le Cordon Bleu.

ZRALEK: So you don’t recommend just anybody deciding to start their own chocolate shop? Having a little training comes in handy?

WITHEROW: Yeah but I didn’t learn how to make chocolate in culinary school. They didn’t guarantee me that. It’s more of working with chocolate. And I always try telling people it’s kind of like people that really like craft beers tend to start home brewing at some point. And I worked a lot with chocolate so I learned how to make my own chocolate. And I just started doing it.

ZRALEK: Where did you sell to first? Who was your first buyer?

WITHEROW: Mitchell’s Deli.  [Mitchell’s, the best deli in Nashville, is literally upstairs from Olive and Sinclair.]

ZRALEK: Are you selling primarily in Middle Tennessee?

WITHEROW: No, we’re nationwide and in Canada.

ZRALEK: So you started in ’08, it’s now January 2011…

WITHEROW: Well, I say we started in ’08. I started experimenting in ’08 and making test batches.

ZRALEK: So when was your first sale?

WITHEROW: September of 2009.

ZRALEK: Wow. You’re a young company.

WITHEROW: Yeah. We’re a year and three months.

ZRALEK: That’s great. . . .

ZRALEK: [O]bviously you wear a lot of hats. I assume that you [serve as] creative director, HR director, CEO, chief culinary designer and are you also making house calls to these places or do you send somebody else out there for you?

WITHEROW: We don’t call on anybody. We don’t approach someone in hopes that they’ll sell our chocolate. Maybe the first two months some of that went on, maybe three, probably two. But we really tried to slow down after that. We did some here and there during brief interims where we kind of thought it was getting quiet and you start to get kind of nervous as a new company or whatever. And you think well we need to pick up the phone and start cold-calling. But I think that we’ve all really found that just holding tight and just getting the product out there and in other ways. Yeah, that’s kind of how we do it.

ZRALEK: Let me ask you who you’ve teamed up with in terms of making chocolate. So you’ve teamed up with Benton’s Hams.

WITHEROW: Yeah, with Alan. And that’s a new something.

ZRALEK: So that’s on its way. Who else have you teamed up with if anybody?

WITHEROW: Well we teamed up with Terrapin, you know, for the Moo Hoo. And we look at all the local guys. I called the Yazoo boys [Linus Hall and his team] and made sure that [they didn’t mind] cause they’re the home team, so…
ZRALEK: Have you done anything with a coffee company yet?

WITHEROW: Yeah, we do stuff with Bob Bernstein [at Bongo Java]  in our normal coffee line. And then we do a line that’s exclusively at Williams-Sonoma [and one] that we do with my buddy Drew [of Drew’s Brew’s].  And it’s a totally different chocolate and a totally different roasted coffee. So it’s kind of a new interpretation of that.

ZRALEK: Okay, one last question…

WITHEROW: Yazoo as well. I gotta say we have teamed up with Yazoo…

ZRALEK: …and you’re drinking Yazoo as we’re talking.

WITHEROW: Yeah.

ZRALEK: So a good loyal follower.

WITHEROW: Yeah, I’m a big fan.

ZRALEK: Who do you see as your main competitor and who do you see—that’s probably a bad term—but who do you see as…is there any other chocolatier in the US that you think does a really good job like you do?

WITHEROW: I don’t want to look at them as competition. I guess in a way I kind of have to. But…

ZRALEK: Who else is a local chocolatier that you like?

WITHEROW: Well, just to…we’re not really chocolatiers. We don’t make truffles, we don’t…

ZRALEK: Chocolate company…what’s the right word?

WITHEROW: We’re chocolate makers. We import beans [then roast them and temper them].

ZRALEK: So who else does it like you do?

WITHEROW: Nobody in Tennessee.










Imported Cocoa Beans at O&S

***********************************

Copyright Stephen J. Zralek 2011 ©. All Rights Reserved.

Anonymous Online Defamation: Fighting Back to Protect Yourself & Your Business



With the explosion of social media, businesses and individuals are becoming daily victims of anonymous online defamation. With tools like Twitter and Topix, now everyone has a megaphone to say whatever they want to the widest possible audience. Many say this is freedom of speech at its best. But as with anything, this freedom comes at a high price.

Putting bloggers on equal footing with traditional journalism has many upsides, but now we are beginning to see the downsides, as well. Online reviews of restaurants and movies, for example, are often helpful. Generally, those reviews state opinions rather than facts, such as: “This movie was terrible,” or “This restaurant has the best food.” Opinion cannot constitute defamation. But websites today also allow patients to review doctors, students to review teachers, and customers to review everything from iPads to car repair service. When these reviews include untrue facts, they may constitute defamation. For example, a review expressing a diner’s opinion about how food tastes is mere opinion and does not constitute defamation, but a review claiming that a restaurant had a health department rating of 65 when the actual rating was 97 is an untrue fact that likely could serve as the basis of a defamation claim.

Sometimes the negative comments are minor and the best advice is to brush them off. But other times the comments are serious and deserve a stronger response, such as when they indicate you committed scandalous or criminal conduct, that you are untrustworthy, or that you have committed malpractice. These comments can damage your reputation and harm you economically if they steer business away from you. When that happens, especially if it happens more than once from the same person, you may have grounds to assert a claim of business interference, and not just defamation.

One of the biggest challenges with the Web 2.0 is the fact that most online reviews and comments are made anonymously. If that’s the case, how can you protect yourself? How can you even find out the identity of the poster?

Fortunately, victims are not without recourse. Most people think that they can say whatever they want online and that no one will ever know who said it. This is incorrect. There are ways to find out the identity of online posters, but you need to act quickly since Internet service providers (ISPs) often destroy records of online activity after 180 days.

If you find that you are the victim of disparaging comments made online, you won’t get very far suing the website that hosts the comments (known as user generated comment or “UGC”). Hosting websites are immune from liability related to UGC under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. But you can have your attorney send a cease & desist letter to the website demanding that the comments be removed. Sometimes websites comply; other times their terms & conditions do not allow them to comply without a court order.

When you want to find the identity of the anonymous poster, and not just have the comments removed, you can also file a “John Doe” lawsuit against unknown defendants, empowering you to subpoena the host website for the IP address of the person posting the comments. From there, you can determine the ISP. Because the Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984 prohibits ISPs from disclosing personally identifying information about Internet users to non-governmental entities without a court order, the next step is to obtain a court order allowing you to subpoena the ISP for the identity of the poster. Recently, a court in Nashville refused to allow an anonymous poster to hide his identity, and allowed the victim to move forward with its subpoena of the ISP.

Finally, responding to anonymous online defamation often requires a multi-faceted approach. Recently, one of my business clients found several comments online that accused its employee of criminal and scandalous conduct. Given the context, the client needed legal advice on not just the social media issues, above, but also with employment law issues. If defamatory comments are made that threaten to damage your reputation and your business, don’t just sit back and take it. Instead, consider your options in fighting back.
© Stephen J. Zralek 2011

10th Annual Fellowship Breakfast Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

On Monday, January 17, 2011, over 450 people joined Bone McAllester Norton at our tenth annual Fellowship Breakfast to celebrate the memory and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


 The celebration was held at the Hutton Hotel in Nashville and featured the Fisk Jubilee Singers as our entertainment.


Bone McAllester Norton's annual Fellowship Breakfast is the firm's most honored tradition.  We founded Bone McAllester Norton in 2002 as a new firm, to put into practice a set of core principles and values to which we are unfailingly committed. We adopted the phrase “Law – Life – Passion” as a shorthand way of expressing those principles. One value about which the firm is passionate is diversity.  We believe that we have created a law firm that reflects the diversity of our clients – people of different idealistic, socioeconomic, educational, ethnic, racial and religious backgrounds - and which reflects the core commitments firm founders Charles W. Bone and Stacey A. Garrett made on the day the firm was created.  Rather than simply closing our offices on the MLK holiday, we decided to honor Dr. King’s memory by inviting a few family members, friends and clients to join us for breakfast.  We spend this time together to reflect upon Dr. King, his legacy, and the contributions he made to our world and to each of us personally.


This year, we were honored to have the two time Grammy-Nominated Fisk Jubilee Singers as our entertainment. In 1871, the original Jubilee Singers introduced "slave songs" to the world. Today, the Fisk Jubilee Singers continue the tradition of singing the Negro spiritual around the world sharing this rich culture while preserving this unique music.


Following the Fisk Jubilee Singers, we opened the floor and encouraged comments by anyone who wished to talk about Dr. King's legacy.  Previous Fellowship Breakfasts have featured prominent civil rights champions Dr. E. Rip Patton, Diane Nash, John Seigenthaler and Mike Cody.


We invite you to view:
About the Fisk Jubilee Singers
Video of the Life and Legacy of Dr. King
Slideshow of our 2011 Fellowship Breakfast


 

Paz Haynes Participates in Nationally Recognized Law Day Program

To commemorate Law Day in 2010, the Nashville Bar Association (NBA) produced a program commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Nashville Student Movement's lunch counter Sit-Ins.


  These Sit-Ins were a seminal event in the advancement of the Nashville community, and the civil rights movement nationwide.  The NBA's presentation honored the "Counsel for the Children" -- the local lawyers who defended the student demonstrators during the Sit-Ins -- with a mock trial involving several distinguished members of the Nashville bench and bar.

Paz Haynes was one of the producers of the program, and served as moderator for a panel discussion after the mock trial.  Two of the "Counsel for the Children," retired Tennessee Supreme Court justice Adolpho A. Birch and trial lawyer George E. ("Citizen") Barrett, shared their experiences and reflections on the Sit-Ins, the trials, and the lawyers and judges involved in these historic events.  The event was filmed to be shared and enjoyed by generations of lawyers.  The "Counsel for the Children" program recently received national acclaim when the NBA received a 2010 Law Day Outstanding Activity Award from the American Bar Association.

Bone McAllester Norton was a sponsor of the "Counsel for the Children" program.  "I was honored to participate in such a memorable and important program for the Nashville Bar,” said Paz. “Through its sponsorship of 'Counsel for the Children', our Firm has ensured that the program will be preserved and appreciated for years to come."


 

Will Cheek Quoted on Whiskey Distilleries in Tennessee

In 2010, Legislature passed a law allowing 43 Tennessee counties to manufacture whiskey.  This law was passed in hopes that new distilleries will work in conjunction with the established brands to create a draw for tourists to Tennessee.


Will Cheek told Westview, "It was seen as being a really strong barrier to starting up, particularly for a microdistillery where you really don't want to spend that much money and you don't have that many people,"


"Any changes to the state liquor laws are going to be very difficult," he said.


"What is happening now really lays the foundation for a whiskey trail that is similar to the bourbon trail that Kentucky has," Cheek said. "The bourbon trail is fairly successful, but what the bourbon trail lacks is an international brand. We know Maker's Mark and we know Wild Turkey, but those aren't big brands in Europe or China or Japan.”


"We've got Jack Daniel's and that might be the best-known brand of spirits worldwide. We have a real marquee that draws people, and if we could have a number of micro-distilleries that are available for touring and marketed properly, it could be really neat."


This story was picked up and repeated in papers like The Leaf Chronicle, The Daily Herald and other papers by the Associated Press.


 

"Anonymous Online Defamation: Fighting Back to Protect Yourself and Your Business"

With the explosion of social media, businesses and individuals are becoming daily victims of anonymous online defamation.

With tools like Twitter and Topix, now everyone has a megaphone to say whatever they want to the widest possible audience.  Many say this is freedom of speech at its best.  But as with anything, this freedom comes at a high price.

Putting bloggers on equal footing with traditional journalism has many upsides, but now we are beginning to see the downsides, as well. Online reviews of restaurants and movies, for example, are often helpful. Generally, those reviews state opinions rather than facts, such as: “This movie was terrible,” or “This restaurant has the best food.”  Opinion cannot constitute defamation. But websites today also allow patients to review doctors, students to review teachers, and customers to review everything from iPads to car repair service. When these reviews include untrue facts, they may constitute defamation.  For example, a review expressing a diner’s opinion about how food tastes is mere opinion and does not constitute defamation, but a review claiming that a restaurant had a health department rating of 65 when the actual rating was 97 is an untrue fact that likely could serve as the basis of a defamation claim.

Sometimes the negative comments are minor and the best advice is to brush them off.  But other times the comments are serious and deserve a stronger response, such as when they indicate you committed scandalous or criminal conduct, that you are untrustworthy, or that you have committed malpractice. These comments can damage your reputation and harm you economically if they steer business away from you.  When that happens, especially if it happens more than once from the same person, you may have grounds to assert a claim of business interference, and not just defamation.

One of the biggest challenges with the Web 2.0 is the fact that most online reviews and comments are made anonymously.  If that’s the case, how can you protect yourself?  How can you even find out the identity of the poster?

Fortunately, victims are not without recourse.  Most people think that they can say whatever they want online and that no one will ever know who said it.  This is incorrect.  There are ways to find out the identity of online posters, but you need to act quickly since Internet service providers (ISPs) often destroy records of online activity after 180 days.

If you find that you are the victim of disparaging comments made online, you won’t get very far suing the website that hosts the comments (known as user generated comment or “UGC”).  Hosting websites are immune from liability related to UGC under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.  But you can have your attorney send a cease and desist letter to the website demanding that the comments be removed.  Sometimes websites comply; other times their terms and conditions do not allow them to comply without a court order.

When you want to find the identity of the anonymous poster, and not just have the comments removed, you can also file a “John Doe” lawsuit against unknown defendants, empowering you to subpoena the host website for the IP address of the person posting the comments.  From there, you can determine the ISP.  Because the Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984 prohibits ISPs from disclosing personally identifying information about Internet users to non-governmental entities without a court order, the next step is to obtain a court order allowing you to subpoena the ISP for the identity of the poster.  Recently, a court in Nashville refused to allow an anonymous poster to hide his identity, and allowed the victim to move forward with its subpoena of the ISP.

Finally, responding to anonymous online defamation often requires a multi-faceted approach. Recently, one of my business clients found several comments online that accused its employee of criminal and scandalous conduct. Given the context, the client needed legal advice on not just the social media issues, above, but also with employment law issues.  If defamatory comments are made that threaten to damage your reputation and your business, don’t just sit back and take it.  Instead, consider your options in fighting back.


 

Marty Cook Goes “Back to School”

Marty Cook and Bone McAllester Norton have partnered with Nannie Berry Elementary School in Hendersonville, Tennessee and our client “COMPASS” (Community Outreach Making Partners At Sumner Schools) for several years.


 COMPASS’ emphasis is to develop partnerships between the business community and Sumner County Public Schools to improve student success.


Marty served as President of the COMPASS Board of Directors and has led Bone McAllester Norton’s involvement at Nannie Berry Elementary School in many different ways. Recently, Bone McAllester Norton participated in the “School Back Pack” program which provided food for less fortunate students at Nannie Berry Elementary over the holidays.  Bone McAllester Norton has also led COMPASS’ school supply drive at the start of each school year and provided tutors in classrooms. We are pleased to have been involved in several incentive programs for the students at Nannie Berry, where prizes such as bikes and buckets of gifts were presented to students who exhibited excellent character. Bone McAllester Norton provides and prepares academic certificates at the end of the school year acknowledging students for their accomplishments over the past year. Marty has been influential in encouraging other businesses in the Hendersonville area to partner in these endeavors.