In The News

Bone McAllester Norton Wins $1.55M Jury Verdict in Plaintiff’s Case

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys David Briley, John Branham and Charles Robert Bone prevailed at trial for the parents of an 18-month old boy who were denied the opportunity to see their son after he died suddenly in June 2008 while with a caregiver.


 The jury awarded a verdict of punitive damages in the amount of $1.25 million and $300,000 in compensatory damages against Forensic Medical Management Services PLC, the firm that handles medical-examiner duties for Metro Nashville.


Click here to read the full article.


 

Bone McAllester Norton Wins $1.55M Jury Verdict in Plaintiff’s Case

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys David Briley, John Branham and Charles Robert Bone prevailed at trial for the parents of an 18-month old boy who were denied the opportunity to see their son after he died suddenly in June 2008 while with a caregiver.

 The jury awarded a verdict of punitive damages in the amount of $1.25 million and $300,000 in compensatory damages against Forensic Medical Management Services PLC, the firm that handles medical-examiner duties for Metro Nashville.

Click here to read the full article.

 

“Sumner Should Remember Neal, Willis With Pride”

Charles W. Bone’s article was published in the "Tennessee Voices" section of the Tennessean on October 29, 2010.


Sumner should remember Neal, Willis with pride
By: Charles W. Bone


With the passing this week of Jim Neal, 2010 has seen the deaths of two of Nashville’s leading lawyers, both of them natives of Sumner County. William R. Willis Jr. also died this year, at the end of July.


Bill and Jim were born 18 months apart on farms only a dozen miles apart at the beginning of the Great Depression when the total population of Sumner County (now over 160,000) was only 33,000.


As a student at Vanderbilt in the 1960s, and a Sumner County native myself, I was privileged to meet Jim and Bill on separate occasions and found both of them proud of their Sumner County heritage.


Both had been raised on farms, as I had been. Jim grew up in Oak Grove in northern Sumner County and Bill’s family lived between Gallatin and Hendersonville.


Both had been outstanding students and veterans. Both were graduates of Vanderbilt University Law School where they had outstanding scholarship achievements.


As a college student, I found both of these men to be especially warm and encouraging about the legal profession, and their enthusiasm for not just the law but for politics, the community and their profession.


A few short years later, as a new young lawyer, I found them to be welcoming and challenging, depending on whether we were working together or on opposite sides of legal matters. Whatever the case, I always found I learned something about law and life from these prominent men.


The good works of Jim Neal and Bill Willis are well-known in this community. We know of Bill’s outstanding legal representation of The Tennessean, his service to the legal profession as the chair of the Board of Professional Responsibility, and his commitment to the work of Nashville Memorial Hospital and the Memorial Foundation.


Lives of great service


Jim became known around the world for his prosecution of Jimmy Hoffa, his participation in the Watergate trials, and the many other famous cases of his great career.


Both have been recognized for their many accomplishments by many different professional and civic organizations.


Men of this caliber can be tempted by success to become arrogant and disinterested in the lives of others, especially the lives of young people. Not so with Bill Willis and Jim Neal. I am especially thankful that these two fine lawyers took an interest in one other young man from Sumner County.


I was blessed by their willingness to befriend and mentor me as a person, and I know I am only one of many lawyers today who will always remember Bill Willis and Jim Neal as heroes of our profession and our community.


 

Charles W. Bone Featured in the Nashville Business Journal’s “Lessons from the Great Recession” Series

Community matters: Bone says leadership carries on beyond the bottom line


Nashville Business Journal "Lessons from the Great Recession"
October 29, 2010
By Brian Reisinger


Charles W. Bone started practicing law in a small office in Gallatin’s historic downtown, believed to be where President Andrew Jackson first hung his shingle as a country lawyer.


“I think that’s a lie,” Bone joked, still relishing the thought.


From those beginnings, the 64-year-old has built a career in law and local politics that has fueled change in the region and left him with a clear view of what matters in a battered economy. From a conference room overlooking downtown Nashville at his law firm Bone McAllester Norton – the ninth largest in the Nashville market – Bone took stock of the economy and Middle Tennessee’ future.


Two years out from the severe deepening of the Great Recession, Bone talked about the importance of reaching beyond what’s right in front of you. That can mean brokering a common goal or drawing a line on a controversial issue. The point is to take action.


His lessons:


1.  What’s good for your neighbor is good for you.


It wasn’t always as easy for Bone to make people sit up and listen as it is today.


One of his first prominent gigs was as attorney for Sumner County, a position that left him feeling Middle Tennessee was too fragmented in its thinking about economic development. He aimed to change that.


“What frustrated me ... was the lack of attention we got from Nashville,” Bone said.


He reached out to area leaders, building relationships and pushing common goals. Today, for instance, he’s a major force in the efforts of Mayor Karl Dean and others to pursue regional transit options.


From Bone’s perspective, Nashville isn’t competing with Franklin for corporate relocations or economic development projects. It’s competing with Austin, Texas, or Charlotte, N.C., and trying to make the world notice, he said.


That means moves like Jackson National Life Insurance Co. of Michigan expanding to Franklin or Nashville’s new Music City Center are a boon for everyone.  They provide jobs at the most critical time, he said, even if other parts of Middle Tennessee feel they’d better benefit from their own new company or project.


If that argument seems to have momentum among some leaders, it’s not for lack of players in government and economic development who think their particular area deserves more love. That, after all, is how it started out in Sumner County for Bone.


2.  Diversify your business.


Bone started as the proverbial “country lawyer” taking criminal cases, litigation and whatever else came his way. The high-rise office hasn’t changed his philosophy.


“My practice has been very diversified,” Bone said.


Therein lies a lesson that many business people value: Diversify your products, services or clients so you’ve got several streams of income. If one stumbles because of a change in the market, another may sustain you, even in an environment in which almost everyone is making less money.


From his roots as an attorney and official in Sumner County, Bone joined other firms and eventually started his own with colleagues in 2002. Bone’s practice has served bankers, entrepreneurs and nonprofits, and major clients of the firm include Fisk University.


Of course, many firms in the area pitch their range of services – arguing that they can meet a client’s every need – while others promote specialties. In general, law firms have found litigation and other work is sustaining them while the number and size of deals has languished in the poor economy.


With about 30 lawyers in his firm, Bone argues that his people can meet almost every need at a fair value. The point is to find a blend that works.


3.  Focus on community.


Community outreach may sound like what you do with your spare time, or money.


For Bone, it’s central to bolstering the regional economy – and it’s not always a feel-good pursuit.


He says it’s “amazing” to see all the varied nonprofits that help the area, with clear evidence in the flood response. Helping “people in great turmoil,” he said, improves their lives and in turn benefits everybody else participating in the same regional economy.


The same goes for issues fewer agree on. Bone thinks it’s important to oppose “English-only” workplace laws or Arizona-style immigration reform.


Those are economic development issues,” he said.


Bone joins other business leaders in opposing those proposals, but legislators pursuing such efforts have argued they protect business interests. In a way, Bone is used to a bit of political tumbling; he’s a Democrat, often serving clients who may be wary of his party’s intentions despite the pro-business work of some moderates locally.


Charles Bone
Age:
64
Title: Chairman
Company:  Bone McAllester Norton
Career highlights:  Attorney with various firms; Sumner County attorney; past president, Sumner County Bar Association; past member, Nashville Bar Association board of directors.


About the series
The Nashville Business Journal is talking to some of the most respected business leaders in Nashville about their most valuable business lessons learned from the Great Recession. 

Rob Pinson to Present Top 10 Year-End Tax Planning Strategies

Bone McAllester Norton attorney Rob Pinson will present the Top 10 Year-End Tax Planning Strategies on November 18th from 8:30am – 10:30am.


  This event is designed for business owners and hosted by KraftCPAs, Accelerent and Bone McAllester Norton.


Topics Include (but not limited to)
• Best ways to take cash out of the company
• Rules for related party deductions
• Research & development tax credits you might have overlooked
• Accelerated depreciation options and strategies
• Using retirement plans to their full tax benefit potential
• Tennessee state tax issues and opportunities
• Update on new and/or expiring tax legislation
• The pros and cons of Roth IRA conversions this year
• Gifting strategies to avoid taxation
• Making charitable contributions from retirement plans


Location: KraftCPAs’ Nashville Office, 555 Great Circle Road (Metro Center)


 

Push for “Tylers Law” After Lawsuit Victory

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys David Briley, John Branham and Charles Robert Bone prevailed at trial for Don and Sarah Sinclair, the parents of an 18-month old boy who were denied the opportunity to see their son after he died suddenly in June 2008 while with a caregiver.


The jury awarded a verdict of punitive damages in the amount of $1.25 million and $300,000 in compensatory damages against Forensic Medical Management Services PLC, the firm that handles medical-examiner duties for Metro Nashville.


Along with four of the twelve jurors, Bone McAllester Norton is pushing to pass “Tylers Law,” a law to ensure no family is ever denied the opportunity to see their deceased child.  This follows a Florida law which guarantees a family the right to see their child after death and before autopsy.


"The circumstances indicated that there was no reason to prevent the parents from seeing their son," said David Briley.


"It's unfortunate that you have to change the law to impose common sense on people. Families need to make that visual connection and begin the process of healing and putting things in order. That's very important. It happened. But to them it is still not real. It's not real until they actually see their son."


NewsChannel5.com ran a story, "Lawsuit Victory Could Pave the Way for New State Law," on this case.


 

Push for “Tylers Law” After Lawsuit Victory

Bone McAllester Norton attorneys David Briley, John Branham and Charles Robert Bone prevailed at trial for Don and Sarah Sinclair, the parents of an 18-month old boy who were denied the opportunity to see their son after he died suddenly in June 2008 while with a caregiver.

The jury awarded a verdict of punitive damages in the amount of $1.25 million and $300,000 in compensatory damages against Forensic Medical Management Services PLC, the firm that handles medical-examiner duties for Metro Nashville.

Along with four of the twelve jurors, Bone McAllester Norton is pushing to pass “Tylers Law,” a law to ensure no family is ever denied the opportunity to see their deceased child.  This follows a Florida law which guarantees a family the right to see their child after death and before autopsy.

"The circumstances indicated that there was no reason to prevent the parents from seeing their son," said David Briley.

"It's unfortunate that you have to change the law to impose common sense on people. Families need to make that visual connection and begin the process of healing and putting things in order. That's very important. It happened. But to them it is still not real. It's not real until they actually see their son."

NewsChannel5.com ran a story, "Lawsuit Victory Could Pave the Way for New State Law," on this case.

 

Trace Blankenship Presented "Private Placements in Tennessee: Anatomy of an Early-Stage Investment"

Bone McAllester Norton attorney Trace Blankenship presented a webcast titled “Private Placements in Tennessee: Anatomy of an Early-State Investment” for the Tennessee Bar Association on October 13, 2010.


Here is a description of the presentation:


As opportunities continue to increase for Tennessee companies to pursue and obtain capital investments, the company’s management and advisers have much to consider as they structure and document the investment.  This session is designed to provide an overview of what exemptions are available under the federal and state securities laws for Tennessee companies obtaining capital from outside investors and what risks need to be considered, along with practical guidance for how to properly document the investment transaction.  Join Trace Blankenship, a securities and M&A attorney at Bone McAllester Norton PLLC, Nashville, Tennessee, in this session to hear about the changing legal landscape for raising capital and best practices for companies considering a private placement offering in Tennessee.


 

Congratulations to 37 of our Clients for Winning in 53 Categories of the Nashville Scene’s Best of Nashville Reader’s Poll

The Alcoholic Beverage Group at Bone McAllester Norton PLLC congratulates 37 of our clients for their well deserved recognition in the Nashville Scene’s 2010 Best of Nashville Reader’s Poll.


  These are the winners in an impressive 53 categories:


Arnold Myint
Best Chef


Arrow
Best Strip Club


Artrageous
Best Charity Event


Baja Burrito
Best Burrito
Best Fish Taco


Belcourt
Best Move Theater
Best Place for a Cheap Date


Beyond the Edge
Best Sports Bar
Best Place to Throw Darts


Black 13
Best Tattoo Studio


Bud’s
Best Liquor Store


Café Coco
Best Late-Night Eats
Best Patio
Best After-Hours Hang


Five Guys
Best French Fries
Best Cheeseburger


Fleming’s
Best Steakhouse


Frist Center for the Visual Arts
Best Museum
Best Art Show - Chihuly at Cheekwood
Best Art Show - Golden Age of Couture at Frist
Best Place for a Cheap Date
Best Place to Take Kids When its Raining


Gigi’s Cupcakes
Best Place to Buy Cupcakes


Gold Rush
Best French Fries
Best Cheap Eats
Best Late-Nights Eats
Best Neighborhood Bar
Best Happy Hour
Best Sports Bar
Best Bar to People-Watch
Best Bartender, Patrick Noles


Grace’s Wine and Spirits
Best Liquor Store


Hutton Hotel
Best Boutique Hotel


Losers
Best Music Industry Hang


Mafiaoza’s
Best Family-Friendly Restaurant


McFadden’s
Best Place to Meet Single Women


Midtown Wine & Spirits
Best (most knowledgeable service) in a Wine Store


Nashville Symphony
Best Performing Arts Group


Nuvo Burrito
Best Burrito


Play
Best Gay Bar
Best Lesbian Bar
Best Place to Dance


Publix
Best Place to Buy Fresh Seafood


Pure Gold’s Crazy Horse
Best Strip Club


Red Rooster
Best New Bar or Club (opened since October 2009)


Ruth’s Chris
Best Steakhouse


Sambuca
Best Place for a Romantic Dinner
Best Restaurant Ambience
Best Service in a Restaurant


September’s
Best Restaurant in Sumner County


Sunset Grill
Best Dessert
Best Late-Nights Eats
Best Wine List in a Restaurant


Suzy Wong’s
Best After-Hours Hang


Trader Joe’s
Best Health Food Store
Best Grocery Store


Tribe
Best Bartender, Loy Carney
Best Martini
Best Pickup Bar
Best Gay Bar
Best Lesbian Bar
Best Place to Meet Single Men


Watanabe
Best Sushi Bar/Japanese Restaurant


Whole Foods
Best Health Food Store
Best Grocery Store
Best Place to Buy Fresh Seafood
Best Place to Shop Green
Best Specialty/Gourmet Store


Woodland Wine Merchant
Best (most knowledgeable service) in a Wine Store


Yazoo
Best Brewhouse


Zumi Sushi
Best Takeout


 

Congratulations to 37 of our Clients for Winning in 53 Categories of the Nashville Scene’s Best of Nashville Reader’s Poll

The Alcoholic Beverage Group at Bone McAllester Norton PLLC congratulates 37 of our clients for their well deserved recognition in the Nashville Scene’s 2010 Best of Nashville Reader’s Poll.

  These are the winners in an impressive 53 categories:

Arnold Myint
Best Chef

Arrow
Best Strip Club

ArtrageousBest Charity Event

Baja BurritoBest Burrito
Best Fish Taco

BelcourtBest Move Theater
Best Place for a Cheap Date

Beyond the EdgeBest Sports Bar
Best Place to Throw Darts

Black 13
Best Tattoo Studio

Bud’s
Best Liquor Store

Café CocoBest Late-Night Eats
Best Patio
Best After-Hours Hang

Five Guys
Best French Fries
Best Cheeseburger

Fleming’sBest Steakhouse

Frist Center for the Visual Arts
Best Museum
Best Art Show - Chihuly at Cheekwood
Best Art Show - Golden Age of Couture at FristBest Place for a Cheap Date
Best Place to Take Kids When its Raining

Gigi’s CupcakesBest Place to Buy Cupcakes

Gold RushBest French Fries
Best Cheap Eats
Best Late-Nights Eats
Best Neighborhood Bar
Best Happy Hour
Best Sports Bar
Best Bar to People-Watch
Best Bartender, Patrick Noles

Grace’s Wine and SpiritsBest Liquor Store

Hutton HotelBest Boutique Hotel

LosersBest Music Industry Hang

Mafiaoza’sBest Family-Friendly Restaurant

McFadden’sBest Place to Meet Single Women

Midtown Wine & SpiritsBest (most knowledgeable service) in a Wine Store

Nashville SymphonyBest Performing Arts Group

Nuvo BurritoBest Burrito

PlayBest Gay Bar
Best Lesbian Bar
Best Place to Dance

PublixBest Place to Buy Fresh Seafood

Pure Gold’s Crazy Horse
Best Strip Club

Red RoosterBest New Bar or Club (opened since October 2009)

Ruth’s ChrisBest Steakhouse

SambucaBest Place for a Romantic Dinner
Best Restaurant Ambience
Best Service in a Restaurant

September’s
Best Restaurant in Sumner County

Sunset Grill
Best Dessert
Best Late-Nights Eats
Best Wine List in a Restaurant

Suzy Wong’s
Best After-Hours Hang

Trader Joe’s
Best Health Food Store
Best Grocery Store

Tribe
Best Bartender, Loy Carney
Best Martini
Best Pickup Bar
Best Gay Bar
Best Lesbian Bar
Best Place to Meet Single Men

WatanabeBest Sushi Bar/Japanese Restaurant

Whole Foods
Best Health Food Store
Best Grocery Store
Best Place to Buy Fresh Seafood
Best Place to Shop Green
Best Specialty/Gourmet Store

Woodland Wine MerchantBest (most knowledgeable service) in a Wine Store

YazooBest Brewhouse

Zumi SushiBest Takeout